Wharram Builders and Friends

A Photo & Discussion Forum for Wharram Design Enthusiasts

All Blog Posts (175)

what is the best method to put the mast up

The foremast of my tiki 38 was put down for repairs on the mastcase. I will have to put it up again, the boat being on the water. Can anyone share experience on how this is best done? Thanks!

Added by Patrick on May 30, 2009 at 1:42am — 4 Comments

Epoxy filler - again!







Once the hull sides cure into place, we remove all of the screws (about 500 total) and fill in the holes. We also fair the hull sides to the backbone. Then comes the dreaded sanding. Though the sanding is not difficult, it is time consuming to do it right and get everything smooth.



When mixing up the epoxy fairing compound, it gets small air bubbles which become exposed during… Continue

Added by Budget Boater on May 29, 2009 at 9:30am — No Comments

Torturing the ply











The bow and stern sections are by far the most difficult parts of the boat to fit and glue in place. The ply is under some serious strain and twist and does not voluntarily want to do what we force it to do. Once we apply the epoxy and glue to the piece backbone, stringers, and bulkheads, we carefully align each piece and work towards… Continue

Added by Budget Boater on May 27, 2009 at 9:00am — No Comments

Skinin' it











Melissa and I removed and coated the cut parts and prepared the for being glued onto the stringers. While Melissa spread epoxy onto the plywood pieces, I coated the stringers and bulkhead edges with a thickened epoxy mixture. We then carefully aligned the pieces and screwed them in place.



Thanks to Norm & Linda Stark for… Continue

Added by Budget Boater on May 25, 2009 at 9:13am — No Comments

Starting the Second Hull

Because the move of the Hull went so quickly, we were able to immediately start on the second hull. In the span of 3 1/2 days, we were able to assemble the back bone, assemble and install the bulkheads, assemble and install the stringers, and dry skin the lower hull. WOW!!! Part of this speed was born from the experience gained on the first hull, the fact that the parts were cut on the CNC for the second hull, and having Chuck's set of experienced hands. This same process took me 2 months on… Continue

Added by Budget Boater on April 3, 2009 at 7:49am — 2 Comments

Moving a Hull - Scary

Again, Chuck and I devised a way to move the hull out of the shop so that hull 2 could be started. We devised a plan to use two 1000lb furniture dollies so that we could roll the hull outside. We both question the stability of the hull while on the dollies, but decided to give it a shot anyway.



We jacked up the hull in one location and inserted a dolly under the hull stand with Melissa's help, then repeated it on the second stand. Then we strapped it all together. We contemplated… Continue

Added by Budget Boater on April 3, 2009 at 7:40am — 1 Comment

Blitz!!



With a visit from Chuck for a couple of weeks, we were able to blitz through an enormous amount of work. He being an experience cabinet maker made our tasks much easier. We were able to finish the upper stringers, put on the upper hull sides, and epoxy glass the upper hull sides.



We were able to work together in unison without much communication. This made the work go smoothly and quickly. tackling any problems that arose were usually… Continue

Added by Budget Boater on April 3, 2009 at 7:26am — No Comments

Filleting the stern





I had to spend some extra time on this stern section due to dropping the stern during the turn over process and the hull landing on the post and cracking. The butt straps in the pictures were lengthened and extend down into the stern area. They were tapered to fit into the tight area, and notched to cover the surface of the exposed area. We screwed and glued them in place, then added the fillets over the entire structure. It is now very… Continue

Added by Budget Boater on January 8, 2009 at 9:17am — 3 Comments

The stem head


This is the Ehecatl stem head. There will be two carved, painted, and varnished pieces of hard wood to go on each side of the stem head once the decks are on and complete. These will add the detail and make the bows of this boat stand out.

Added by Budget Boater on December 30, 2008 at 12:26pm — No Comments

More Than A Place To Rest

The after end of the port hull's main cabin, showing the still-unfinished galley. The surfaces need to be sanded back and sealed better and the stainless Plastimo two-burner and oven unit has yet to be fitted and plumbed in.

Added by The Ethnic Catamaran Company on December 23, 2008 at 9:42am — No Comments

Measure Twice, Cut Once, Get Six Guys To Help

Sometimes the only way to make a launch date is to enlist more manpower (of course, there will also be one person who will stand around just watching!)

Added by The Ethnic Catamaran Company on December 20, 2008 at 12:12pm — No Comments

Upper Hull Parts

I have not been able to access the blog on our regular site blog, so am moving the blog here. Many of the next few blogs happened over the last 4-6 weeks so are not what I am currently working on. I just need to get the information up.



I started cutting out the parts for the upper hull bulkheads on the CNC. It took a little longer to draw the bulkheads and parts… Continue

Added by Budget Boater on December 11, 2008 at 7:00pm — No Comments

Water borne epoxy. The above, of which details are below, has proved incredibly useful to me. All the work to date, on my TangaroaMk1, has been done while the boat is afloat. The biggest problem ha…

Water borne epoxy.





The above, of which details are below, has proved incredibly useful to me. All the work to date, on my TangaroaMk1, has been done while the boat is afloat. The biggest problem has been to keep the moisture content of timber and ply down to acceptable levels.



This,water borne epoxy, I use as a sealer. It is tolerant of damper timber than regular epoxy . A couple of coats within a half hour or so enable regular epoxy/fibre mixes to then be used for… Continue

Added by Pete Rigby on December 8, 2008 at 2:31pm — 1 Comment

Pete Rigby's Tangaroa Mk 1

‘Eva’ is a Tangaroa Mk1, built in the 1970’s, and in 2006, given to me.



The previous owner was an Australian, married to a woman from The Phillipines. They had lived aboard for some years, with the idea of sailing the boat back to Australia. This dream faded.



I had carefully avoided anything to do with boats for many, many years. I’d grown up with a boat builder father, who stopped early in the 1960’s, when it seemed timber was doomed, and GRP was the… Continue

Added by Pete Rigby on December 1, 2008 at 3:42pm — 1 Comment

Interior Painting





This is more a test than anything else to see if we can continue our main website blog here so that comments can be made and more people will have access to the information.



We spent the afternoon painting the portions of the hull interior that were about to be covered with bunks, interior decks, and/or seating. I had spent about an hour applying tape and paper in preparation for spray painting, but then found that both of my sprayers were dead. So, we bit the… Continue

Added by Budget Boater on October 29, 2008 at 11:36am — 1 Comment

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