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Has anyone tried disassembling their Wharram on the water by moving the hulls closer together for trailering or vice versa? I have seen pictures of people launching with the hulls close together using a set of short beams, and then extending them on the water. I can't figure out how it would actually be done. Please let me know if anyone knows the secret.

Roger

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Thanks Brad and Ian.

With the Tiki 31 there are 4 beams and the whole arrangement is not easy to set up and lash up really tight accurately ( ie keels plus or minus 3mm to centres) onshore, never mind about on the water.

If anyone wanted to visit a living nightmare on me, they could ask me to set up my boat with the beams on the water. And the response would be......xxxx xxx

Roger, I'm not sure where I saw this now. Possibly on this site but maybe YouTube. Anyway it was a tiki 21

While on the launching trailer the forward and aft crossbeam were lashed into position on the port side only leaving a lose overhang to starboard. The mast beam was lashed into position on the  starboard side only and overhung to port. When launched the hulls were spread to the correct width, held in place I guess by the two opposing righting forces created by the initial beam lashings. Final lashings were then completed.

I wish I could remember where I saw it to give you pics. Perhaps someone else may know of this technique.

Neil, I'm sure I've seen pictures of that somewhere too.  It makes perfect sense, as long as you can be sure of having flat water...

NeilR said:

Roger, I'm not sure where I saw this now. Possibly on this site but maybe YouTube. Anyway it was a tiki 21

While on the launching trailer the forward and aft crossbeam were lashed into position on the port side only leaving a lose overhang to starboard. The mast beam was lashed into position on the  starboard side only and overhung to port. When launched the hulls were spread to the correct width, held in place I guess by the two opposing righting forces created by the initial beam lashings. Final lashings were then completed.

I wish I could remember where I saw it to give you pics. Perhaps someone else may know of this technique.

Thanks Everybody,

The key insight seems to be that the beams are lashed on alternate sides so that there is a lever arm on each hull to stop it rolling over. Am doing it in a few weeks and will post pictures.

Roger

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