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To all wharramists: 2 weeks ago  I have finally realized my long dream and acquired the Tiki 36 Pelican formerly Tamalaa. She is now in Brest for a refit after sea trials. When I had sold my Tiki 28 I had looked upon this boat and decided to buy her 4 years ago. But when I rang Scott Brown he told me he had sold the boat the day before. Shoot! 

Then I had three years with another cat, an Azuli F40 by Erik Lerouge that had gone transatlantic twice and was well equiped. But that boat is a bronco: she would go nowhere in small airs and become a wild and impredictible beast when wind came, forcing reefing at 17 knots with a 56sq meters main sail. Impossible to auto pilot in F5 therefore to chart maps or run for a tea in the galley. I quited and sold her to a British guy (Hi Jonathan) who with his very pregnant wife took her back to Plymouth. They by the way are friends of Pip Patterson in Torquey Point who had sold me my first Tiki, small world hey? 

I have been here and there deciding against a very overpriced Tiki 38 in the Caribbean, visiting two Tiki 38 in Saint Tropez (the boat is a floating wreck) and in Marseille. That last boat Pilgrim was constructed by Jacques Pierret in New Jersey and sailed back across the Atlantic there is a nice movie on Youtube. But, pardon Jacques, like many 38 she had no central pod a major requirement for me, used as I was to the very clever Tiki 28 central pod. And Jacques was willing to co-own the boat but probably would not have happily met this change. 

At one point, I had discussed with my friend David Yettram was lives and works in Jersey in Saint Helier: David has had a Tiki 26 that won all the local regattas, and then he bought a Tiki 30. Does this all sound like a family or what? David works at the fisheries in Channel Islands arresting the french fishermen who illegally fish in The Minquiers archipelago and he said that Pelican was not going any where. I found easily Matthew Thomasson the owner and made the right move: for youngsters, who may ignore it, and seniors who had forgotten, it requires a piece of paper a pen an envelop and a stamp, and with the right words in sentences that coordinate themselves nicely, it is called a letter!!

Roughly I was asking a permission to come and visit the boat nothing too committing. 3 days pass and MAtt emails back yes come along. With my friend Anne we booked a ferry and guest house and came in Saint-Aubin with the owner the next day. There she was sitting in the mud of that drying mooring. We spent an hour on the boat and Matt said at one point Do you want to buy the boat? And I said yes very much and offered a price, which he accepted the next day. Does this sound miraculous? Yes it does. The boat was not for sale but the fruit was ripe and I just picked it up with the mighty power of one small written in english letter. If the boat had been for sale, I would certainly have face competition, and I am not sure I was ready for it. The boat, thanks to Matt is more than equiped: autopilot, solar panels, 2 new OB yamaha 9.9 HP, MOB, Navtex, VHF AIS, new Plastimo stove, furling genoa, one main one "artimon" sail (all in good condition, one Spi in a sock, one tempest sail, two parachute anchors, two 16 and 20 kilos blade and CQR anchors. The boats can house 6 people for a small cruise over a week end or 3 people for passages. She has that marvellously devised central pod, thanks to Andy Smith. We are in heaven. We shall certainly keep you posted. Jean-Michel

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Congratulations! She looks nice.

/Kristian.

Jean-Michel,

De bonnes choses viennent à ceux qui les cherchent! Bon voyage...

Kim

Salut Jean-Michel

Nous sommes heureux que tu es pu acquérir ce Tiki36. La nacelle centrale est un gros plus qui me parait indispensable pour le voyage au long cours.

Quand largues-tu les amarres pour les Antilles et au-delà?

Nous sommes actuellement au mouillage au sud ouest de Gomera aux Canaries, au sud du port de Valle Gran Rey : il fait beau et chaud, l'île est magnifique.

Amitiés

Bertrand et Marie-Hélène

Hello Jean-Michel,

we visited that TIki near St. Tropez (let's avoid naming it here, "se dice el pecado mas no el pecador"). It certainly didn't look well built (so good for CE certifications), and even less well-maintained. Equipment is not great either, all in all making the asking price ridiculous.

However, I am new to Wharrams and wooden boats in general, and in my ignorance I wasn't able to classify it as a "floating wreck" as you do... for my illustration and prevention of future mistakes, I would really appreciate if you could enumerate the top issues you saw -- specially those which can't be resolved without rebuilding the whole boat.

Thanks a lot,

Jordi.



Jordi said:

Hello Jean-Michel,

we visited that TIki near St. Tropez (let's avoid naming it here, "se dice el pecado mas no el pecador"). It certainly didn't look well built (so good for CE certifications), and even less well-maintained. Equipment is not great either, all in all making the asking price ridiculous.

However, I am new to Wharrams and wooden boats in general, and in my ignorance I wasn't able to classify it as a "floating wreck" as you do... for my illustration and prevention of future mistakes, I would really appreciate if you could enumerate the top issues you saw -- specially those which can't be resolved without rebuilding the whole boat.

Thanks a lot,

Jordi.

Yes, I did indeed say that :-)

Jean-Michel: did your answer get lost?

Là où on s'aperçoit qu'on se fait vite casser en deux par les mecs qui cherchent des bateaux à acheter au lieu de les construire.

This is where we discover that we got flamed by guys who want to buy boats instead of building them.

You might be right Jacques.

Jean-Michel: please refrain from answering. This is a builder's site and we have no right to criticize anyone's loving work -- and there's no point in doing it.

I would still like to learn how to sort out a poorly-finished boat from a "floating wreck"... I'll open a separate thread for that.

Peut-être que vous avez raison, Jacques.

Jean-Michel: SVP ne répondez pas. Ceci est un site pour les constructeurs et nous n'avons pas le droit de critiquer le travail soigneux de personne -- et il n'y a pas raison pour le faire.

J'aimerais encore d’apprendre comment distinguer un bateau pas trop bien fini d'un "floating wreck"... Je vais ouvrir un nouvelle conversation pour ça.

Jordi.

Hi several bits of news from Tigaki Tiki 36. We made it from Mindelo in Cabo Verde to St François in Guadeloupe in 20 days, having to steer 24/7 be cause of autopilot on the rear beam very far from the cockpit and also be cause of power shortage even with new batteries. And the windvane is still wind and unpredictable. No major difficulties during that transat but going from Les Saintes to Dominica, the starboard tiller snapped in 2 pieces, and we were Lucky to find an american californian mark in Portsmouth mooring who helped us cut and install a replacement tiller in redwood. We made it back to Guadeloupe and now I am waiting for the carpenter to give me news. I have been trying to send pictures from my iPad but up to now to no avail. Ill give it another try. Crossing with my daughter Morgane has been an exhilarating d'aventure that Will last fore ver for both of us. Cheers Jean-Michel
Great news, Jean-Michel! The tiller broke in the right place!! ;-) yes, please give the pictures another try. Excellent
Here is another try for the pix...
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Here are some other pixels of the broken tiller and the replacement Quick fix made in Dominica
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