Wharram Builders and Friends

A Photo & Discussion Forum for Wharram Design Enthusiasts

What is the width of the 'double' bunks/berths of the Tangaroa Mk IV?

Also would anyone have some pics of the interior or know where I might find some of Tangaroa Mk IV?

Been looking on web but not really found any.

Cheers, Allen

Views: 1202

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

If built per plans, there are no true "double" bunks on the Tangaroa MKIV. The actual width depends on the thickness of the cushion since it widens with height above the bunk floor. My 3" thick cushions measured about 35" across the widest part.

BB thanks. Yea, that's why I put "double". lol

I'm thinking real seriously about building a Tangaroa Mk IV instead of stretched Tanenui now, as I have just found out there is cheap (not to mention that that they even exist) anchor moorings here.

Previously I thought would have to trailer the boat assemble it, sail for few days or week and then bring back home.

Now that she can be left on the water most of the time I can build something a bit bigger. Main thing is I want standing headroom. I'm not going to live aboard but more of stay aboard. As in several weeks or more at a time, in addition to day or couple days sailing.

Will get Design  Improvement package 2 and build with Tiki style Crossbeams/lashings & Wingsail rig. The Improvement drawings are a bit spendy unfortunately.

I'm interested to learn more about the mod/upgrades on Forever Young. Will mount beams on top of deck & use lashings. Don't want beam pockets, probably raise cabin tops 4" or so & have bulwarks.

Don't know what all was done to forever Young, but her bunk is Big! Want to find out what had to be done to accomplish it.

I'm excitedly watching your build of your Nari Mk IV.  If I could, I'd love to build a Nari Mk II. Probably my favorite Wharram Cat. It's just out of my budget & really bigger than I need. The Tangaroa is about the ideal size for me. Don't want to go any bigger than I need to, to get what I need.  

Cheers, Allen

My Tangaroa had a true double bunk that was 51" across. This was accomplished in a manner similar to what I will be doing on the Narai.

Basically, in the starboard hull, you will make a full bulkhead at station 5 to close off the central part of the cabin from the aft part of the hull. Now a full size head can be installed in the aft part of the starboard hull. The forward bunk will move aft into the central cabin and be raised up. Some people pull the entire bunk into the cabin and move the hatch to the aft part of the cabin top, or as mine was, the bunk is moved aft 2/3rds of is length and raised, and your feet extend under the deck area forward of the cabin top, which gives a decent standing area in front of the bunk and the hatch can stay in its original location.

What are your thoughts on this idea?

Extend the cabin aft to beam 4 or at least closer to beam 4, since beam 3 is not going to go across the hulls, but rest and lashed on inboard side of hulls like Forever Young.

Would give much more standing height room this way.

Cheers, Allen

It is a good idea. If beam three is now just a mast beam, then the cabin tops could/should be extended back. However, it is wise to have a bulkhead within a few inches of the new cabin top aft wall. How this would work, I do not know without access to plans and the mods from the Tiki beams.

Allen Bosely said:

What are your thoughts on this idea?

Extend the cabin aft to beam 4 or at least closer to beam 4, since beam 3 is not going to go across the hulls, but rest and lashed on inboard side of hulls like Forever Young.

Would give much more standing height room this way.

Cheers, Allen

Beam three won't have a mast sitting on it as I'm going with single mast sloop. I want the clear deck space.

I'm anxious to get the plans, upgrade drawings & wingsail drawing. Waiting on some money to get here that should have already been here. 

Cheers, Allen

After hanging around the Wharram community for a # of years, the one thing I've noticed is almost all these Wharrams end up on the market for sale. Alfs boat, Jacque's beautiful 38, Sea Dragon, Peace, Lipa Lipa, etc. etc. etc.

Plans change, life changes, and the boats need to be eventually sold.

Those of us looking for an already built Wharram usually have fallen in love with true Wharrams. Not somebody's custom version of a wharram. I think if a builder really wants to protect his future investment, resale value, and have a boat that is marketable years down the road, he should build to plans. Adding 4 inches to the cabin height changes the look of the boat. Yes it may make the cabin a bit more roomy, but is it worth it in the end when the boat sits on the market, and then has to be sold cheap? There are many designs with more roomy interiors to choose from. Build to plans, and stand under a hatch when more headroom is needed.

If a builder is going to spend years of his life, and many, many thousands of dollars building one of these boats, he may as well build something that has real value at the end of the dream. Just something to think about.

Good sailing

Rod, all boats end up for sale at some point. The venerable Morgan Out Island 41 is a great example of a cult boat. I have seen all types of customizations in those hulls, all of which hold value to various owners.

As for Wharrams, why do you think it is that JWD sells "upgrade" packages to the original plans? Could it be that good enough can be made better? Personally, I am building my boat for me and my family, not a future owner whom I don't even know. I will get all of my value out of building, cruising, and living aboard. Any monies lost or gained from some eventual sale will not really matter.

(FWIW: my Tiki 30 build had very minor changes, most of which no one would ever notice, and it still sold for 1/3 of what I had in it. Very few boats ever hold their value, especially home built wooden boats.)

BB, I agree.

I enjoy the building, designing, customizing and fine tuning process to make her what I like, want/need very much. For me it's something I've always done so am comfortable doing. Actually it's a very important aspect for me.

As you say, I'm building her for me and the cost of time & money will be amortized out over years. Most things sell for less what they originally cost when later sold other than houses usually, even then houses don't always sell for what they cost.

Rod I do agree, if I were building a Wharram for spec to sell I would probably then stick quite close to the plans. But if I were building a Wharram on spec to sell, I wouldn't build a Classic model but rather a Tiki (just more mainstream). But I think the only way to build a boat (one at a time) to sell and be able to hope to make a profit would be build one on commission. But that's a whole different ball game and beyond my situation or desire. 

Also I think that the kind of changes and how well they are integrated into the specific boat design can make a difference. But that applies to houses also. I was a contractor for many years and have seen houses that were poorly modified designed/laid out that it even tho well constructed really, reduced their value.

I want to keep her in the spirit and philosophy that she was designed in. I think of her as an expedition type boat, rugged, somewhat basic for living on & sailing in warm latitudes, not intended for cold weather or as a luxury yacht. So the changes are to optimize her for me and my intended type of use. I like this quote from JWD: "Tangaroa is a tough, no nonsense, no frills, deep water voyaging, up to 4 people" sailboat.

Actually that's a good word, 'optimized' for me & the kind of 'mission' she'll be used for. Not trying to redesign her into something she wasn't designed for. Anyway, enough of my armchair philosophy about it. Sorry, didn't intend to be so wordy! lol

Cheers, Allen

I agree the boats can always be improved. A perfect example is the Tiki 38 mast step that had to be re engineered. I've wondered what a naval architect would say if they were to run the #s on these designs.

I just think it would be better to maintain the basic shapes and dimensions of the boats. Many people have to sell their boats soon after they complete them. Keeping the boat an original wharram shape is a bit of insurance in case things change. I understand the desire to tweak the designs. I've been thinking about how cool a Pahi 26 stretched to 29 or 30 would be. The Tiki 33 Gunther built was a success. I think I'm just "anti high freeboard"......




Budget Boater said:

Rod, all boats end up for sale at some point. The venerable Morgan Out Island 41 is a great example of a cult boat. I have seen all types of customizations in those hulls, all of which hold value to various owners.

As for Wharrams, why do you think it is that JWD sells "upgrade" packages to the original plans? Could it be that good enough can be made better? Personally, I am building my boat for me and my family, not a future owner whom I don't even know. I will get all of my value out of building, cruising, and living aboard. Any monies lost or gained from some eventual sale will not really matter.

(FWIW: my Tiki 30 build had very minor changes, most of which no one would ever notice, and it still sold for 1/3 of what I had in it. Very few boats ever hold their value, especially home built wooden boats.)

Rod, do you not care for the Pahi 31? I haven't looked closely at the Pahi 26, I checked out the Pahi 31 for a bit. It's nice but I prefer the more open type of deck better. Tho I do think they are beautiful.

The only really noticeable changes I plan on making is extending the cabin aft toward beam 4.

I thinking about making the cabin sides, front, back vertical & having pound dead lights with a ring on outside. Like the old classic sailboats were. Even on the upper hull where some put rectangular dead lights having round with port ring.
I'll have to draw it up and see if it will look correct. Even if it looks good on paper I'll do a good mockup to be sure.

I like the old classic sailboats. Even tho they weren't Catamarans.

Everything on the outside will be sheathed in fiberglass, then either painted or varnished.

The cabin sides, front, back & probably roof will be clear coated in fiberglass. As will beams, mast bulwarks, tillers & hatches.

Interior & exterior wood that isn't painted will be dyed a reddish brown. Not stained as stain isn't very color fast.
Will use W.D. Lockwood water base dye, it doesn't affect the epoxy bond to the wood.

I'm making the sails out of Oceananus Sail Cloth. It looks & feels like natural canvas but is Dacron. It comes in 18" wide panels that are sewn horizontally like the canvas sails were. It's pretty neat stuff. Quiet & soft, not crinkly like regular Dacron sail cloth.
The Wharram Wingsail is an ideal type sail for this sailcloth.

Bottom will be deep red, hull sides black.

Slats of decking & trim made from Monkeypod wood. Very pretty wood, about the same weight & not quite as stron as Douglas Fir, but has extremely low shrinkage & movement. Good rot & insect resistance just oil it.
I can get it locally here.

Cleats & such will beade drone IPE.
Interesting wood to work with. Strong, hard, dense, just about wont rot. Stuff doesn't float. To heavy to use in most applications tho.

Thinking about using Monkeypod ⅜" thick by 4" or 5" T & G them to make panals and class the outside with 6oz glass & clear epoxy then varnish. The wood is very beautiful.
Would actually be lighter than using 9mm Hydrotek Meranti. Would still need to glass the outside of the Meranti anyway. Be a lot cheaper too.

Not sure what color the deck will be.
But notot white that's for sure. :-)

She will be very vintage/ classic, a bit different than most. But I really enjoy designing & then building.

Might cast my own Bronze port light rings so I can have bronze ones.

Just the outside trim rings in bronze are $200 - $300 each! I'll need a lot of them. To expensive for me to afford!

Cheers, Allen

Good Discussion....

I just sold, 2 days back, my old Tangaroa Mk 1 project, Bacliff,Tx...Wow....I am so happy to pass it on to

Shaun and Casey, the new Lovers...I have another Cat, Bruce Wild's personal 37 ft foam core glass, nice  boat and I love it too...I just love boats...

I got just the Wharram hulls a long time back, 2001, out of a warehouse in Houston, I was the 4th owner/builder.  It is modified, as with study, I went for some ply box beams, and a 19.5 beam, and

attached them solid to hulls after seeing some Wharrams in NZ and Aust in the old Multihull Mag.

Also build ply balsa core panels and installed over the beams , over berths, along with about 12 in raised ply bulwarks, which now gives full sitting head room in berths.  also used panels for center decks...The boat looks

good...Shaun and I would like any feed back, pro and con, on solid attached beams...He is repairing

some soft spots on fore ply crosss beam and may go back with lashing...

A big thanks to Wharram Builders Site and the Moderator for making the collection to sell the boat.

Thanks...They hop to splash it later this year.  I think they will make it....

Peace

Mellow Mel......aka  MRT

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2020   Created by Budget Boater.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service