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Hi guys, this is Giovani from Brazil, I am currently about to finish building a Tiki 38. I intent to live aboard.
Here in Brazil we have basically sunny days despite I would like a protect shelter in case of rain. We have a lot of rain here also...I´d like space to have guests on board, something like a living room, when sailing and at anchor.


Anyone has ideas to improve the deckpod. I really like Luckyfish´s pod.
I am considereing to lower to floor about 100mm and maybe rising the sits a bit.
I consider make the pod bigger extending aft.
And make a rigid roof with solar pannels above.

Do you guys consider extend the sides too? Does it make the corridor to the hulls too narrow? I like Neil´s advice (Gleda) It would be nice to be able to seat four people for dinner and have seating for maybe six people to drink.
One big concern is the extra weigh perhaps. Or it´s just exchange wood from the corridor floor to the pod?


Anyway I apprecciate all the comments especially from those who live aboard a Tiki 38.
Thank you very much, I hope to see you soon in the water...
Giovani

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The two primary modifications you could make would be to widen the cockpit and use your modified coachroofs as seat backs, and to overhang a seating area on beam three (as done on Chuck's Tiki 38).

However, the space between beam 2 and the mast beam is quite large. While at anchor, you can suspend a canvas cover between the masts and use this area for lounging, eating, etc.

Lowering the floor is a good idea (mine is 100 mm lower), then you do not sit with your ears between our knees and a roof is not that high. Try to build everything as ligh as possible using foam sandwich, there is alot of weight in the cockpit (and the roof). Have the cockpit floor on a light slant preventing you to stand in a puddle, same thing fo the seats.
The original cockpit design sits 4 - 6 people (sometimes a bit cramped but it works).
A tent between hatches and roof and cockpit makes a lot of difference on rainy days (it is like a different boat).
If the tent is built strongly you can sail with it up to 20 knots of wind (or even more), when tacking it makes you slower, downwind it gives you a little extra boost.
I would also recommend to use the space between cockpit and hull for extra lockers (lightweight!), they will come in extremely handy for ropes, fenders, cockpit tables, empty beer cans,...

I also recommend to change the mast foot design, that the masts can tilt backwards, this make your life later much easier, this might need to be considered in the cockpit design as well and will require to be able to remove the cockpit roof easily (lightweight again and simple fittings).

Thank you for your idea Chuck, your Deckpod must have a generous space to sit and living there but I intent to have a bunk with a roof. Next step Deckpod, I´ll up date with the progress. Regards

Chuck Valley said:

Thank you Budget for your ideias. I will widen the pod and lower the floor 100mm. I will stick with the idea to have a bunk with a roof in the aft. I´m not sure about the roof in the helmsman area. Do I put a rigid roof and a solar pannel or a removeble awning? 

Budget Boater said:

The two primary modifications you could make would be to widen the cockpit and use your modified coachroofs as seat backs, and to overhang a seating area on beam three (as done on Chuck's Tiki 38).

However, the space between beam 2 and the mast beam is quite large. While at anchor, you can suspend a canvas cover between the masts and use this area for lounging, eating, etc.

Thank you Oliver, this is a good collection of images! I recently format my computer and lost all the images I used for reference while building...

Olivier R. said:

Thank you Björn for your help. Definitely I will lower the floor and try to figure out some tent between hatches and roof and cockpit, if you have some image I appreciate. Related to the  mast foot design if you have some image or sketch I appreciate. 

Björn said:

Lowering the floor is a good idea (mine is 100 mm lower), then you do not sit with your ears between our knees and a roof is not that high. Try to build everything as ligh as possible using foam sandwich, there is alot of weight in the cockpit (and the roof). Have the cockpit floor on a light slant preventing you to stand in a puddle, same thing fo the seats.
The original cockpit design sits 4 - 6 people (sometimes a bit cramped but it works).
A tent between hatches and roof and cockpit makes a lot of difference on rainy days (it is like a different boat).
If the tent is built strongly you can sail with it up to 20 knots of wind (or even more), when tacking it makes you slower, downwind it gives you a little extra boost.
I would also recommend to use the space between cockpit and hull for extra lockers (lightweight!), they will come in extremely handy for ropes, fenders, cockpit tables, empty beer cans,...

I also recommend to change the mast foot design, that the masts can tilt backwards, this make your life later much easier, this might need to be considered in the cockpit design as well and will require to be able to remove the cockpit roof easily (lightweight again and simple fittings).

The video that Chuck provided is the cockpit that I designed for his Tiki 38. There is a hard top with solar panels (not shown in the video) and curtains that allow complete enclosure of the cockpit (not shown in the video) that allow for anything (including sleeping) in the cockpit. The video shows the lowered floor, and extended cockpit with larger seating/sleeping areas than in the original design. The cockpit can easily seat 8-10 comfortably with or without a table.

Because we are in launch phase, the hardtop and side curtains are not currently attached, and a table has not yet been constructed.

My suggestion to you (based on your modifications) is to widen the cockpit all the way to the coach roofs, and use the sloped coach roofs as seat backs. Regardless, you are constrained by the distance between the mast beam and beam 3, which is too short for bunks. The only available space is over beam 3 as was done on Chuck's Tiki 38 "Dog" as shown in the video.

Giovani Frisene said:

Thank you Budget for your ideias. I will widen the pod and lower the floor 100mm. I will stick with the idea to have a bunk with a roof in the aft. I´m not sure about the roof in the helmsman area. Do I put a rigid roof and a solar pannel or a removeble awning? 

Budget Boater said:

The two primary modifications you could make would be to widen the cockpit and use your modified coachroofs as seat backs, and to overhang a seating area on beam three (as done on Chuck's Tiki 38).

However, the space between beam 2 and the mast beam is quite large. While at anchor, you can suspend a canvas cover between the masts and use this area for lounging, eating, etc.

Have a look at the pictures in my profile and you find pretty much everything for the first overview

Giovani Frisene said:

Thank you Björn for your help. Definitely I will lower the floor and try to figure out some tent between hatches and roof and cockpit, if you have some image I appreciate. Related to the  mast foot design if you have some image or sketch I appreciate. 

Björn said:

Lowering the floor is a good idea (mine is 100 mm lower), then you do not sit with your ears between our knees and a roof is not that high. Try to build everything as ligh as possible using foam sandwich, there is alot of weight in the cockpit (and the roof). Have the cockpit floor on a light slant preventing you to stand in a puddle, same thing fo the seats.
The original cockpit design sits 4 - 6 people (sometimes a bit cramped but it works).
A tent between hatches and roof and cockpit makes a lot of difference on rainy days (it is like a different boat).
If the tent is built strongly you can sail with it up to 20 knots of wind (or even more), when tacking it makes you slower, downwind it gives you a little extra boost.
I would also recommend to use the space between cockpit and hull for extra lockers (lightweight!), they will come in extremely handy for ropes, fenders, cockpit tables, empty beer cans,...

I also recommend to change the mast foot design, that the masts can tilt backwards, this make your life later much easier, this might need to be considered in the cockpit design as well and will require to be able to remove the cockpit roof easily (lightweight again and simple fittings).
Have a look at the modified tiki 38 on the sian sailing Thailand site, looks like a much better setup for a liveaboard, my t 38 also has a nice pod with a table and 2 good single beds, easily seats 6 for dinner and a great place to keep watch from and still room to walk past , photos are here , I am building a roof to go behind the pod also.

Thank you, Dave, I saw your images. amazing, enormous deckpod. I´m not planning extend the pod to the foremast, I try to take advantage of all the space available between mast beam and beam 3.  

dave tomlinson said:

Have a look at the modified tiki 38 on the sian sailing Thailand site, looks like a much better setup for a liveaboard, my t 38 also has a nice pod with a table and 2 good single beds, easily seats 6 for dinner and a great place to keep watch from and still room to walk past , photos are here , I am building a roof to go behind the pod also.

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