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Anchor chain box alongside mast-beam, sprit pole and GPS showing speed

Hi everybody, just a couple of pics that might be of interest.

Previously, our anchor chain was stowed forward of the mast but we've added more chain for cruising, so we built a chain box alongside the mast-beam to carry the anchor chain/rode. It's a much bigger space, the weight is a bit further back, and it takes a bit of weight off the mast-beam. 

You can see our new sprit pole in the same pic, with the new reacher set, as you can see in the GPS pic, giving us over 10knots in under 14knots of breeze! That whole day was spent romping along at 8-10knots, and we travelled more than 100nm in 12hrs, while crossing from the Philippines to Palau. When I came up for my watch at sunset that evening, the hulls were thrumming and we were doing over 11knots, so we decided we should maybe take the reacher down for the night ;-) 

PS We've started using gaff vangs as per other discussions in the forum, and I agree they're very good. It's a hassle having 2more lines, but it keeps the gaffs off the stays when you're off the wind, which makes me feel happier that they're not being chaffed.  

We'll be sailing from Palau to Raja Empat in Eastern Indonesia when the winds go Northerly, then on to Bali. I hope we can meet up with some other Wharrams along the way ;-) 

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Great Pictures. I too have a T38 and have been thinking about a sprit pole out front. Are you happy with the weight of yours ie the strength? I am currently designing/building a new mast beam as its great to have 2 anchors at the ready.

These boats can get along alright. On one recent trip I had a tail wind of 20 gusting to 25 knots. The boat was self steering and I was heading straight down wind with just my kite up and I hit 14.3 knots. The boat was totally undercontrol  and would have happily gone faster if I had a little bit of rear main on.What a neat adventure you're having! regards Brett

Hi Brett. Wow 14+ knots! Sounds amazing, I'm also really enjoying sailing the 38, the acceleration in gusts is wonderful eh? Re the sprit pole... I used a fairly light stainless pipe, I forget the actual spec, around 4mm I guess, then had heavy tangs, an end-cap, and a strong cleat welded on to it. The whole thing weighs perhaps 12kgs. I had a 'reacher' made at Hyde Sails for US$1,400, and it's been working great with the pole, easy up, easy down. Up to around 15knots, it works very well with both wingsails from, on the beam, to a shy reach, and with the mainsail only when broad-reaching. I love the whole set up so far, it works great, and (so far) the pole has never looked stressed in terms of its strength. 

Just a note. When we built the block to hold the inboard end of the sprit pole, we also built a timber bollard, as you'd have on most monohulls, which has proved super useful.

The extra box-beam provides seaworthy stowage for two sets of anchor tackle, and has allowed us to carry most of the weight of the anchor chain further aft, compensating for the extra anchor we're now carrying upfront.

Where are you currently sailing Brett?

All the best,

Norm   

Hi Norm

Thanks for sharing your experience with the sprit etc. My boat is currently on the front lawn but will be relaunching around feb . I am based just north of Auckland in the North Island of New Zealand. We have a beautiful gulf . I live on the harbours edge here in Whangateau harbour but plan to be living aboard next year. So mosty sailing the Northland coast of the North Island. Bloody wonderful!!!!!Planning to venture further afield later, including French Polynesia and then the east coast of Australia for the humpback whales!

Norm van't Hoff said:

Hi Brett. Wow 14+ knots! Sounds amazing, I'm also really enjoying sailing the 38, the acceleration in gusts is wonderful eh? Re the sprit pole... I used a fairly light stainless pipe, I forget the actual spec, around 4mm I guess, then had heavy tangs, an end-cap, and a strong cleat welded on to it. The whole thing weighs perhaps 12kgs. I had a 'reacher' made at Hyde Sails for US$1,400, and it's been working great with the pole, easy up, easy down. Up to around 15knots, it works very well with both wingsails from, on the beam, to a shy reach, and with the mainsail only when broad-reaching. I love the whole set up so far, it works great, and (so far) the pole has never looked stressed in terms of its strength. 

Just a note. When we built the block to hold the inboard end of the sprit pole, we also built a timber bollard, as you'd have on most monohulls, which has proved super useful.

The extra box-beam provides seaworthy stowage for two sets of anchor tackle, and has allowed us to carry most of the weight of the anchor chain further aft, compensating for the extra anchor we're now carrying upfront.

Where are you currently sailing Brett?

All the best,

Norm   

Hi Norm,

what is the sail area of the reacher? Is there much of a difference to the cruising chute?

I also would like to tune my Tiki a bit, I have a cruising chute and I do not use it that often,  but a light wind foresail on a pole could help here.

Do you have more pictures of the sail up and the pole arrangement? What is roughly the OD of the pole?

Regards Björn

Hi again Bjorn, here's the details from when I ordered the reacher from Hyde Sails in Cebu, Philippines: 

Screecher w/ rope luff

Area 37m2

Cloth 1.5oz Nylon

Cut Tri Radial Cut

Price USD1308.00

I have a small spinnaker too which, we use running square downwind (tacked down to the bows), but for reaching, this sail makes a big difference. Passaging from the Philippines to Palau, we covered 100nm+ during daylight hours, we were doing 9-11.5knots all day, in 12-17knots of wind, broad-reaching with the reacher and mainsail. 

The pole is stainless pipe, 60mm in diameter x 3m long. I had tangs (for stays down to each bow) and a cleat (for the downhaul), plus an end cap, welded on to it. Note that in the first photos I had it stayed down to the same place as the headsail, but the angles are wrong, so as you can see in the photo with my son standing on the pole, it is now stayed to the stems. 

The reacher could have been bigger, for very light airs it's too small, ideally, we'd have a huge reacher/spinnaker for very light airs, plus the smaller kite + reacher for 10-15knots. After 15knots, the jib is often sufficient, although it's no use on a very broad-reach - it is blanketed by the foresail.   

Another configuration would do away with the furling jib, alternating a large genoa (10-15knots) with smaller jib (15knots+), then you'd only need a big kite + big reacher for light airs, but the furling jib is also very convenient...  

Hope this helps, 

Norm

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Hi Norm, 

was the sail custom made or one of the standards? What did you spec to them?

I got Hyde sails from Cebu as well when I got the boat, the main sails are pretty stiff but they are doing ok. Wharram quotes for cruising chute a bit over 50 m2 sail area (I will have to check how much mine is:-)

Maybe a code zero with a furler on the pole and huge sail area could be something....

Interesting comments about your engines and the spray as well, mine got soaked but I never looked inside since they kept running well. If you come up with a good deflector design, I would adapt it as well. I will think about it also.

Björn

Hi Bjorn, attached is the drawing I sent them, and they quoted and made the sail from this. A 50m2 kite sounds good for light airs. What's a 'code zero'? 

I'll post about the engines and pods if I find a good solution, but I suggest you check inside the covers for salt, I have had to wash mine with fresh water several times. 

Norm 

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Code Zero seems just another description for an asymmetric light wind foresail, their seem to be quite a few and it is confusing, here is some description http://www.de.northsails.com/SEGEL/VorwindSegel/AlleVorwindSegel/ta..., some time ago I had found a better one which nicely explains the angle to the wind the best suited for.

Thanks Bjorn

there is also a nice description from Hyde SAils how to handle a cruising chute, if you have an email I can send it to you.
PS Quite a cool trip zou are on, my cruising range, the Baltic, is more cold and can be pretty choppy.

Thanks Bjorn, my email is: normbali@yahoo.com  And yes, I can recommend cruising in the tropics, it's warm/hot all the time, although the wind is often not enough this close to the equator. This area, Raja Ampat, is indeed very, very special. By all means 'friend' me on Facebook to see more photos, my Facebook ID; Norm van't Hoff 

Take care, Norm 

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