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Please excuse my poor sketching skills.

I have opted for a Narai MKIV (modified) for several reasons, the most significant of which is the expected hours to complete, in part due to the modifications I expect to utilize. Another big reason is my family size. I need a large four cabin layout with a master and a full size head area. Though the TIKI 38 nearly offered all of this, it is not adequate. As we near the completion of the Tiki 38 "Dog", I can surmise that the "aft cabins" are simply too small for my purposes.

The Tiki 46 is more boat than I want to build. And having now built a Tiki 30 and 38, as well as completely rebuilt a Tangaroa, The Classic Design Narai MKIV is, in my opinion, the better choice for us, especially with the modifications we intend to make, while using epoxy glue.

We will be widening the beam overall to 23.5' by using Tiki style I-Beams of our own design. The beam troughs will be eliminated altogether and the beams will sit on the flat deck in chocks and lashed to the hulls Tiki style.

In order to partition the boat to our satisfaction, we will be closing off the central part of both hulls similar to the Tiki 38. This will create two significant cabins for and aft, each with 6'2" standing headroom with the added coach roofs between the beams. The central area of one hull will be a full sized galley with refrigerator and freezer (sitting room will be eliminated since I never used it on any of the boats I cruised on, preferring to eat outside under canopy.) The central area of the other hull will contain the queen sized master berth with cabinets. There will be a door in the aft bulkhead of this cabin that will allow for an en-suite head, which can also be accessed from the deck.

Because of the raised deck, we will be able to easily accommodate a spacious centrally located sunken steering cockpit and seating area of approximately 100 sq feet. Fore and aft of this area will be full slatted decks all the way to the bows and sterns (I had a similar configuration on my Tangaroa, and fell in love with it.) We may incorporate a simple drop-down boarding ladder, but we will port the dingy over the side as I have always done.

The simple and inexpensive Crab Claw ketch rig will complete the basic boat and will be simple to install, rig, and maintain, with no winches, and no heavy strains on the rigging.

At this point, the layout is pretty much set in stone, as the keels have been cut, and one is already assembled, and the 24 foot long beams have been built. The beginning of this build will be slow,  and projects will only be completed in our rare spare time.

I just hope this will be the last boat I build!

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 "I just hope this will be the last boat I build!"

Oh it will be.... for a while. :-)

Cheers, Allen

The Narai I went to look at in Italy had increased beam. I have been on a tiki 38, and Indigo had much more space below. I understand why you like the design. It's very striking.
Hey BB, would you know how many sheets of plywood a Narai Mk II takes?
How many sheets of ply will your Narai Mk IV use?
The beam troughs on the Tangaroa MkIV takes 12 sheets!

I'll be building the Tiki style I-Beams set on top of deck and lashed like Tiki 38.

How do you feel the Tangaroa MkIV and Narai Mk II compare?
I mean I know 4'-6" in length & 6" in hull beam.
But what would one get in a Narai Mk II as compared to a Tangaroa?

I know your building a Nari Mk IV not the Narai Mk II.

If you don't mind so many questions.

How do you see the differences & between the Tangaroa Mk IV, Narai Mk II & Narai Mk IV or how they differ.

As in what does one gain from the longer length & width in a Narai Mk II & Mk IV over a Tangaroa Mk IV?

I really like the Narai Mk II, a lot! Lol
But don't know if it would gain me much over a Tangaroa Mk IV for my purposes. Mostly for a couple to cruise & stay aboard a lot and have close to a queen size bed in one hull.

The Narai Mk IV is bigger than what I want.

It's going to be a long (hopefully very very long term, like last boat!)
So just wanted to be sure I don't regret going to the Narai Mk II. I can't really tell what I would gain in over all real world benefits of a Nari Mk II vs a Tangaroa Mk II.

Cheers, Allen

I do not specifically know how many sheets of plywood are required for the Narai MKII, but the MKIV requires 101 sheets. Because I am making four extra cabin tops, I will still be using close to 100 sheets, even though I am eliminating the beam troughs.

I do not really know enough about the MKII, to answer your questions in a satisfactory manner. My old Tangaroa MKIV had an elevated main bed that was a true double. It was my second favorite boat I ever owned next to my exquisitely built junk rigged Colvin Gazelle. From my experience, I think the Tangaroa MKIV is a great boat for a couple with a few modifications, and that is what I would own again if I didn't have four children, and we were just cruising as a couple. It is not too big, and not too small. But this is just my opinion.

As far as the size difference between the Narai MKII and MKIV, they are the same. The extra hull width is derived by raising the decks to the level of the bulwark of the MKII, so there is very little extra materials used to build one over the other, and almost none if you eliminate the beam troughs.

In the end, build what you love and don't worry about any differences. There will always be compromise, and if the slightly increased time and cost to build is the only true factor, then that is a pittance compared to building the wrong boat. If you really like the Narai MKII, then don't fret over the little it may or may not gain you over another design. Your mind has already solved the problem, and you know where your heart is.

BB, can you tell us more about your Crab Claw rig your planning?

Iv'e pretty much decided to build a Tangaroa Mk IV and stretch it 2'-6" in the middle of hulls. That gives me me a 38" OAL, 31" WWL and a bit more room in in cabin, plus a little more buoyancy/payload, tho I have no idea how much. 

I've talked (emails) with Hanneke about the Tanenui which was not a problem.

At this point I'm planning on Wingsail Schooner rig. I'm very interested in the Crab Claw rig. But really know much about it & how it works. Looking forward to yours.

Cheers, Allen

I wish there was something I could tell you, but I know very little about the rig. I will be designing it by the seat of my pants, if I build it. I am also still considering a stayed junk rig as well.

Allen Bosely said:

BB, can you tell us more about your Crab Claw rig your planning?

Iv'e pretty much decided to build a Tangaroa Mk IV and stretch it 2'-6" in the middle of hulls. That gives me me a 38" OAL, 31" WWL and a bit more room in in cabin, plus a little more buoyancy/payload, tho I have no idea how much. 

I've talked (emails) with Hanneke about the Tanenui which was not a problem.

At this point I'm planning on Wingsail Schooner rig. I'm very interested in the Crab Claw rig. But really know much about it & how it works. Looking forward to yours.

Cheers, Allen

 Aloha BB, how goes the progress?  Have you designed the cross beams yet? I was wondering how they compare to the Narai Mk IV stock beams and the Design Package Upgrade Tiki style beams or even the stock Tiki 38 cross beams for that matter?

 I wanted to say thanks for the encouragement you gave me about building a Narai Mk IV. the comment 'you know in your heart what you already' really helped! It was true. I'm very happy that I realized what I really wanted and actually what design will suit my needs. Don't want it too big, but really don't want it too small as it will be a liveaboard or at least a long time 'stayaboard' & cruiser.

 It really dawned on me that building a sailboat is quite different than just buying one in the sense that if a person buys a boat, sails it for a while then realizes/decides they want/need a bigger, more capable boat, they can sell the current one and buy a bigger one.

But when building one, especially one in the Tangaroa, Tiki 38 & Narai size range. It's not something one wants to turn around and start over! Even more so when we out our heart & 'soul' into designing out & building all the little details that make it ours! I want to get it right the first time, cuz there probably ain't going to be a next time! lol  

Cheers, Allen

We built the beams first, several months ago. I would say they are similar to Tiki 46 beams, but I do not know for sure. I designed them myself based on experience. I do not have the design package upgrade.

They have two 18mm ply webs for the center of the "I", and three layers each of 5/4" x 6" lumber top and bottom with triangular supports. They are near 15" tall, 5.25" wide, and 24' long. There are four of them total (three pictured.) They do not taper off like T38/46 beams, but are just straight so that they will follow the lines of my coach roofs (which will have flat tops.)

I really do not know how they compare to the original beams since I never even looked at the plan sheet for them.



Allen Bosely said:

 Aloha BB, how goes the progress?  Have you designed the cross beams yet? I was wondering how they compare to the Narai Mk IV stock beams and the Design Package Upgrade Tiki style beams or even the stock Tiki 38 cross beams for that matter?

 I wanted to say thanks for the encouragement you gave me about building a Narai Mk IV. the comment 'you know in your heart what you already' really helped! It was true. I'm very happy that I realized what I really wanted and actually what design will suit my needs. Don't want it too big, but really don't want it too small as it will be a liveaboard or at least a long time 'stayaboard' & cruiser.

 It really dawned on me that building a sailboat is quite different than just buying one in the sense that if a person buys a boat, sails it for a while then realizes/decides they want/need a bigger, more capable boat, they can sell the current one and buy a bigger one.

But when building one, especially one in the Tangaroa, Tiki 38 & Narai size range. It's not something one wants to turn around and start over! Even more so when we out our heart & 'soul' into designing out & building all the little details that make it ours! I want to get it right the first time, cuz there probably ain't going to be a next time! lol  

Cheers, Allen

They look good, sure should be good & stout. 

Cheers, Allen

you must be beaming,once you had finished those.

Hey Budge anymore picks please.

This project has been on hold for the past year as we get everything finished on the Tiki 38 "Dog." If all goes well, we will be back to work on the Narai this fall. At that point, we will keep our blog updated, and start our Youtube Video series.

salti said:

Hey Budge anymore picks please.

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