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And now came the tanks began to toil hydraulic. Where to hold? which way to hold? will join the two? Will be 100 or 200 Lts? 50 on each side? If it is 100 on each side, lost Epace storage, but what store? what it takes inside the boat? If only 100 Lts on one side with what we can balance the other way? The pump pulls the water or only if the pipe is full (it autoaspirante?) Where will move the hoses? They are how many liters per person in the sea? It is water to drink? Let's put a filter? can be a good idea. And the bed covers, will give it to get the tank? Access for service will be where?
All tips are welcome.

 

Att Roger

 


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Each tank 50 l (+- 14 gal), we bougth 2 tanks, we can buy another 2, or not.

Rogerio, it looks like you have a T30. How much you need is entirely personal. Do you want only drinking water, do you want freshwater showers, will you have to have enough for long passages? Electric or manual pumps?

For me with my T38 I wanted enough for 1 gallon/4 liters of drinking water for 4 people for a possible maximum of 30 days. This is planning for the longest ocean crossing we are likely to do, with a small margin of safety.  That's 120 gallons or almost 500 liters. A lot of water and a lot of weight. I did not want to be lashing plastic water cans all over the place so I built 2 linked water tanks under the main bunk on the starboard side to hold 50 gallons/200 liters total. a smaller 20 gallon/80 liter tank in the saloon. The balance will be in plastic 5 gallon/20 liter cans, used only when necessary and stored in the saloon under the seats. (I built my saloon with a free-standing table and bench seats on three sides.)

 

The idea is to use the saloon tank for cooking and drinking, refill from the starboard tanks as needed. The saloon tank for the galley also will provide freshwater for the sink in the head. The water pumps for those two are manual foot pumps.  That will give us a good idea of water consumption and will be the only place to draw water. It will have a filter. Depending on the source of the water when refilling tanks it's a good idea to add a little bleach to each tank. I don't remember the amounts but perhaps something like a drop per liter?  I am not too worried about the water weight. The heavy tanks are centralized and will only weigh 100 kg or so more than the other side at most. I also have a manual desalinator for emergency use.

 

My build has been stopped for a while now because of an injury, unrelated to the boat and I have not yet plumbed everything in. But the plan is to have deck fills for the tanks on each hull. Water will be pumped from starboard to the saloon tank using the deck fills and a small 12 volt pump. I designed it this way to force a regular check on water consumption with manual foot pumps to limit waste. If you have electric pumps you can get small submersible pumps that you put in the tank that need no priming. With the small height difference between your tanks and the sinks even an externally mounted tank would need no priming and the delay to get water would be minimal.

Rogerio,i would be careful not to have all your water supply connected together for risk of contamination is higher as well as the risk of loosing it to a leak in the system.in my opinion having seperate water storage tanks is the way to go.

cheers paul.

Hi Axel, our intention is to go from Rio de Janeiro to Fernando de Noronha, up the Brazilian coast, with trips 1-3 days at sea. I thought having three liters per person for 4 people for 15 days = 180 liters. But these 50Lts tanks are cheap here. So I can use two on each side. by connecting the hoses.
We will have an electric pump to serve three taps, kitchen, bathroom and shower cockpit. The biggest doubt is how to pull the  water to
four tanks at the same time. If this is really necessary, or if I have to manually control the level of the tanks. And where make holes in hull and cockpit.

 

Thanks for your answer



Axel said:

Rogerio, it looks like you have a T30. How much you need is entirely personal. Do you want only drinking water, do you want freshwater showers, will you have to have enough for long passages? Electric or manual pumps?

For me with my T38 I wanted enough for 1 gallon/4 liters of drinking water for 4 people for a possible maximum of 30 days. This is planning for the longest ocean crossing we are likely to do, with a small margin of safety.  That's 120 gallons or almost 500 liters. A lot of water and a lot of weight. I did not want to be lashing plastic water cans all over the place so I built 2 linked water tanks under the main bunk on the starboard side to hold 50 gallons/200 liters total. a smaller 20 gallon/80 liter tank in the saloon. The balance will be in plastic 5 gallon/20 liter cans, used only when necessary and stored in the saloon under the seats. (I built my saloon with a free-standing table and bench seats on three sides.)

 

The idea is to use the saloon tank for cooking and drinking, refill from the starboard tanks as needed. The saloon tank for the galley also will provide freshwater for the sink in the head. The water pumps for those two are manual foot pumps.  That will give us a good idea of water consumption and will be the only place to draw water. It will have a filter. Depending on the source of the water when refilling tanks it's a good idea to add a little bleach to each tank. I don't remember the amounts but perhaps something like a drop per liter?  I am not too worried about the water weight. The heavy tanks are centralized and will only weigh 100 kg or so more than the other side at most. I also have a manual desalinator for emergency use.

 

My build has been stopped for a while now because of an injury, unrelated to the boat and I have not yet plumbed everything in. But the plan is to have deck fills for the tanks on each hull. Water will be pumped from starboard to the saloon tank using the deck fills and a small 12 volt pump. I designed it this way to force a regular check on water consumption with manual foot pumps to limit waste. If you have electric pumps you can get small submersible pumps that you put in the tank that need no priming. With the small height difference between your tanks and the sinks even an externally mounted tank would need no priming and the delay to get water would be minimal.

 

Rogerio, I had the same question about joining all the tanks together or not. After thinking about running pipe from one hull to the other I decided it would be easier and more secure to have a deck fill on each hull. That way you can move water when needed from one hull to the other. Sounds like you could run the shower from one sides tanks and the galley from the other sides tanks?

 

Axel

I have two options:

 

Option 1: pump on port hull , beside the tank , in same level (pipe full anytime). But distant another tanks in starboard hull.

 

Option 2: pump on cockpit , more simple hoses but pump up to tanks level.

 

We are use one jabsco 2.9 pressure eletric pump (we buy today)

 

 

Axel said:

Rogerio, I had the same question about joining all the tanks together or not. After thinking about running pipe from one hull to the other I decided it would be easier and more secure to have a deck fill on each hull. That way you can move water when needed from one hull to the other. Sounds like you could run the shower from one sides tanks and the galley from the other sides tanks?

 

Axel




 

Option 3: pump on port hull , beside the tank , in same level (pipe full anytime). 4x20Lts bottles  in starboard hull.

 

See our instalation in

http://tikirio.blogspot.com/2011/08/hoje-terminamos-de-prender-os-t...


Rogerio Martin said:




 

Option 3: pump on port hull , beside the tank , in same level (pipe full anytime). 4x20Lts bottles  in starboard hull.

 

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