Wharram Builders and Friends

A Photo & Discussion Forum for Wharram Design Enthusiasts

Paul anderson's Comments

Comment Wall (47 comments)

At 4:13pm on January 3, 2011, Filippo Mezzatesta said…

Thx! you're right, a lot of fun :P

sometimes I think the building process (with mistakes and satisfactions) will be better than sailing!

Ciao!

At 2:21pm on March 22, 2011, Rogerio Martin said…
Thanks, it was my frist sailing in one wharram...
At 7:48pm on March 24, 2011, Rogerio Martin said…
Thank you...
At 1:45pm on March 25, 2011, Hans Hammig said…
Hi Paul, I am 30 km true north of Brits, in the bush. See my website www.phefo.com
At 7:32am on April 7, 2011, Thomas Nielsen said…
I've been doing a bunch of repair work this spring and thinking I should blog about them.  I've had few issues.  a piece of wood rot because I forgot to epoxy all of it kind of like a cavity.  the oak I used has been a problem, it doesn't like epoxy and the biggest one - my mast step knuckle shearing off.  Noticed while sailing, dropped the mast, built a deeper knuckle and recessed it into the maast step plate, screwed and glued.  Overall maintenance hasn't been huge.  Now for things I'd change?  the biggest is watching out that you don't go adding more and more stuff on board.  In the Pacific NorthWest good ventilation and a cockpit tent are key because of the rain.  I'll write more later.
At 10:48pm on April 10, 2011, Capgeraldo said…
...and all began with building a catamaran. lots of such places around Australia
At 4:06pm on May 19, 2011, Rogerio Martin said…
Rick is one vagabound... only our security guard, almost eat the plans !!! kkk
At 2:25pm on May 23, 2011, Rogerio Martin said…

Thank you, Paul,

And your 26' ? Post some photos...

At 10:21pm on June 6, 2011, Duncan Clausen said…
I started out as a 50% owner, with me doing the building and a mate putting up the cash, he bought out my share so the boat is still in Durban.
At 3:52pm on June 13, 2011, Al Richardson said…

Hi Paul,

A mix of the practical and aesthetic. Increasing the volume of the cabin allows the bunks to be raised giving some extra stowage as well as more room in the sail locker. I also prefer the way it looks aesthetically, I always liked the look of the Tiki 28 and of course "Cooking Fat". The blended deckline is common on other Wharram designs, so I am not reinventing the wheel but I may borrow design details from others of the Tiki range just as I would from other builders (with acknowledgement and gratitude of course). As far as I know nobody has done this mod on a Tiki 26, I think it would be worth the effort, research and additional build time.

Cheers

Al

At 6:24pm on July 24, 2011, james Livingston said…

thanks paul,

i'd still like to pitch in and help someone else before i begin, if only to fill my favour bank for when i get started myself. and although i've done a fair bit of sailing (racing monohulls) i've never actually been on a Wharram or seen one in the flesh, so I'm really starting behind the eightball.

 

At 5:41am on July 28, 2011, Arthur Little said…
Thanks Paul!  Looking forward to the experiences building my tiki 26 will bring, and more so to the experiences sailing her!
At 3:56pm on November 18, 2011, Klaus Pedersen said…

Thanks Paul - who cannot enjoy spending hous and hours and hours soaked in epoxy etc ... !

At 8:26pm on November 25, 2011, surfnkiteallday said…

Gday Paul,Hows it goin m8?Yeah the i was fortunate enough to be in Indonesia for a good selection of timbers.A lot of mine was selected from well seasoned recycled timber and in the case of the decks came from old warehouse beams.Teak,old teak.When you cut it the the dust can be squeezed into oily balls.perfect for your decks.best Dave

At 3:02pm on December 12, 2011, Robert Hughes said…

Hi Paul!  I've uploaded a few pics of Zest, my T26.  Hope you like them!

At 7:58pm on February 6, 2012, Ralf said…

Paul, have you considered a steel pipe as rear beam to hold your netting? Could be stainles or galvanized and painted and the ends plugged with epoxy. As it is much stronger than aluminum you will get away with a smaller diameter and wall thickness, in the end the difference in weight might be less than one thinks first.

I mention this because galv. steel would much cheaper and in my part of the world marine grade alu pipe is near impossible to find while steel pipes are no problem to get.

When I built my  rear beam I found that wood is quite heavy and a steel pipe would have been lighter for the same strength but I need to attach a bracket for my wind vane, so steel was not an option for me. If it were just for lashing a net to it, I would have used steel pipe.

Happy building

Ralf

At 9:47pm on February 6, 2012, kim whitmyre said…

Paul, my netting beam is an aluminum pipe: wall thickness is 6mm, diameter is 57mm. I can sit on the middle of it with no deflection: very strong. You can see it in my photos on site.

At 7:25pm on February 7, 2012, kim whitmyre said…
Forgot to mention that the aluminum is marine-grade, what is known as 6061 in the U.S.
At 10:48pm on February 7, 2012, Scott Williams said…

Paul, my hollow, semi-triangular section Doug fir net beam is plenty stiff, yet lightweight.  I can sit or stand on it at midpoint with no flex.  The details of the design are on my blog.  I think the teak rail for trampoline lashings contributes a lot to the stiffness, as does the glass sheathing all the way around it.  The reason I went this way instead of round aluminum is because i didn't want the tramp lashings to go all the way around the beam, and I wanted to be able to mount things on it with screws.  

At 2:36am on February 8, 2012, paul anderson said…

Thank you fellas,unlike the U.S. here in AUST anything with'' marine '' comes at a premium price a mate of mine had a look at the beam i had made and reckons it ain't too heavy and i am just being a girl;)

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