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Folks,

I am getting close to completing my Tiki 21. Well, closer to completion anyway. Two are hulls done, the beams are all made up, and I’m working on the bridge deck.

Anyway, I plan to launch and recover from a beach, so I need a beach trolley. Rather than re-invent the wheel, or in this case the trolley, I thought I’d put the word out and see if anyone has any good design ideas and/or photos of simple trolleys that work well?

A friend of mine has been using a road trailer to launch and recover a 20-foot sports monohull from the beach, but it’s always a colossal headache. The road tires sink into the sand and the bearings rust out.

My needs are simpler. I’m not taking it on the road. I just need to get my T-21 across 50-60 feet of sand and onto a hard track along the back of the beach. My plan is to let it sit there fully assembled until we go sailing again.

I’ve been giving the idea some thought and been toying with the concept of a simple trolley that uses slings or strops instead of cradles to hold the hulls. That way the bows would float in and get tied down (just forward of the mast beam). Then, as the trolley is pulled out of the sea, the sterns would settle into the rear slings.

Just an idea at present. I am sure there are a lot of ways to skin this particular cat! I can’t be the first to be considering launching the boat.

Any input gratefully received.

Cheers

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Stefano,

Thanks. I made something like that to move my hulls around individually. And it works quite well once it's set just aft of the middle of the hull.

I'm still thinking about something a bit more sophisticated for the launch trolley. I'm considering box section galvanised steel for rails with a few rollers on top, and one or two guides like on your dolly to get the hulls settled.

I've got two smaller, wide profile wheels that I can use as a jockey on the front for steering, and a pair of larger wide profile wheels to take the main load.

I am thinking about also using box section for cross members . The main wheels will be mounted on stub axles welded to one of the cross members.

Instead of welding up the whole thing, I think I will use flanges and bolts to connect it all together. That way, I can take it apart if needs be.

That's my thinking at the moment. I will post some drawings once I get them drafted up.

Cheers


Stefano Silvestri said:

This is my beach trolley. It works, but my need is to get the hulls off the road trolley down to the seaside and then back again. Two wheels allow you to turn right or left while you can't do it with four wheels cradles.

All the best

Stef

One of my criteria was that the trolleys must be easy to carry in my car.  I hire a car transporter trailer when I need to move the boat by road, so I don't have a road trailer, and I didn't want to leave a launching trolley at the boatyard when the boat is afloat.

Here's a picture of my trolleys when I finished building them:-

The wheels have quick-release pins, and the hull supports can be removed by undoing two nuts on each one.  The platforms are sized to just fit in the back of the car and two people can easily lift them in.

After I first used the trolleys I added places for lead ballast, because they floated too well and were difficult to get out from under the boat in the water!  I lift the lead off when the trolleys are not in the water, and carry it separately in the car, it weighs about the same as half a person.

Excellent. A picture that is certainly worth a 1,000 words. But thanks for the words as well. Very useful.

I have two of those wheels. I am using them on my dolly. They work well on the hard. How do you find they work in the wet sand when you are recovering the boat?

Let me know. Much appreciated.

Cheers



Robert Hughes said:

One of my criteria was that the trolleys must be easy to carry in my car.  I hire a car transporter trailer when I need to move the boat by road, so I don't have a road trailer, and I didn't want to leave a launching trolley at the boatyard when the boat is afloat.

Here's a picture of my trolleys when I finished building them:-

The wheels have quick-release pins, and the hull supports can be removed by undoing two nuts on each one.  The platforms are sized to just fit in the back of the car and two people can easily lift them in.

After I first used the trolleys I added places for lead ballast, because they floated too well and were difficult to get out from under the boat in the water!  I lift the lead off when the trolleys are not in the water, and carry it separately in the car, it weighs about the same as half a person.

We've not used them on wet sand, only on a hard so far.  One thing I would say is that these particular wheels are a bit marginal for weightbearing capacity with the T26, although they've been ok so far.  The plastic rims limit the pressure you can run the tyres at, and they seem to "squish" a lot when you tip it up to turn a corner.  I leave the motors, batteries and anchors off until the boat's afloat.  If I was building trolleys again I'd use the same design but probably steel rims.  I guess when it comes to sand, more wheels are better than fewer, and you want big ones with wide tyres.

Wet sand is a nightmare. And finding wheels here in Hong Kong has been a challenge. Supply is extremely limited and ordering from overseas is slow and very pricy.

 

However, I managed to snag a pair of pretty wide profile tyres that might do the job.

Got them second hand from a guy who had built a trolley for a power boat.

They have steel rims and a bush for the axle rather than bearings. Regular bearings rust up horribly.

 

I have some trolley designs in my head and on odd bits of paper.

I'll post a pic once I get some drawings together.


Robert Hughes said:

We've not used them on wet sand, only on a hard so far.  One thing I would say is that these particular wheels are a bit marginal for weightbearing capacity with the T26, although they've been ok so far.  The plastic rims limit the pressure you can run the tyres at, and they seem to "squish" a lot when you tip it up to turn a corner.  I leave the motors, batteries and anchors off until the boat's afloat.  If I was building trolleys again I'd use the same design but probably steel rims.  I guess when it comes to sand, more wheels are better than fewer, and you want big ones with wide tyres.

"finding wheels here in Hong Kong has been a challenge"

Brian, 

You're in Hong Kong? So I am, (Aberdeen) and I plan to built a Tiki21 as well. Would love to see your boat!

Eric

Eric. Jo san!

Yup, I'm in Hong Kong. On Lantau to be precise.

If you don't mind a ferry ride, I'd be happy to pick you up from the pier in Mui Wo and drive you round to where my Tiki 21 is sitting.

Congratulations on deciding build a Tiki. I've had a lot of fun building mine and learned a lot.

But I think the biggest challenge of building one in Hong Kong has been sourcing the materials. Wheels are a good example. So was finding a 6.5 metre section of aluminium tube to use as a mast too ages. I eventually tracked down a supplier in Mong Kok, but they only sell 6 metre sections, so some sleeving and extending was required.

Also, getting the pipe trucked to my place cost almost as much as buying the pipe in the first place (I am sure it'll be cheaper getting it to Aberdeen).

I'd be happy to let you know where I got what I got. That might speed things up a little.

Anyway, by all means, get in touch and come and see how it has all turned out.

Give me a call on 2122 9762 or 9755 3310. I'm working during the week. But I'm free most Saturdays and Sundays.

Cheers

Zhao San Brian,

How are you? Do you envoy sailing your boat?

I finaly got the plans for the Tiki 21, and intend to start building late June/early July in China, where I found a suitable place.(In Dan Shui, close to Huizhou)

I am now looking for plywood, wood and epoxy.

Could you tell me which brand of epoxy you used? Did you go for West System, or did you choose an alternative brand, available here at a cheaper price?

Also, I believe that your plywood was chinese made? How was the quality, and do you have an idea of the manufacturer's name?

Any information will be welcome, 

Happy sailing, 

Éric



Brian Paterson said:

Eric. Jo san!

Yup, I'm in Hong Kong. On Lantau to be precise.

If you don't mind a ferry ride, I'd be happy to pick you up from the pier in Mui Wo and drive you round to where my Tiki 21 is sitting.

Congratulations on deciding build a Tiki. I've had a lot of fun building mine and learned a lot.

But I think the biggest challenge of building one in Hong Kong has been sourcing the materials. Wheels are a good example. So was finding a 6.5 metre section of aluminium tube to use as a mast too ages. I eventually tracked down a supplier in Mong Kok, but they only sell 6 metre sections, so some sleeving and extending was required.

Also, getting the pipe trucked to my place cost almost as much as buying the pipe in the first place (I am sure it'll be cheaper getting it to Aberdeen).

I'd be happy to let you know where I got what I got. That might speed things up a little.

Anyway, by all means, get in touch and come and see how it has all turned out.

Give me a call on 2122 9762 or 9755 3310. I'm working during the week. But I'm free most Saturdays and Sundays.

Cheers

Has anyone tried the Harbor Freight dollys as a simple/temporary boat mover?

http://www.harborfreight.com/18-in-x-12-14-in-1000-lb-capacity-hard...

Thanks.

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