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Tikis (and others) in rough seas and when beating upwind take a lot of water over the front-hatches. Does anyone have a method to build-/make them real watertight? 

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wakataitea said:



kim whitmyre said:

Hi Glenn, 

Hanneke has a point there...

....what do we want. a dry cabin or a housewife friendly boat????

Patrick McGrath said.

I remember, in the early days, with the "Classic designs"' there was a lot of trouble with crossbeam failures.

Experimental arrangements with rubber connections and rope lashings, coupled with poor construction of beams by DIY builders resulted in many problems.

One Tehini builder, in Toronto Canada, used a civil engineer to specify steel "I" section girders for the crossbeams, bolted solidly to re-enforced gunnwhales, via the beam flanges. This resulted in a very stiff boat, with very low torsional movement.

This enabled him to use a powerful Bermuda rig, resulting in a great performing boat which successfully cruised the Caribbean islands for many years.

Wharram sailed on this boat during the World Multihull Symposium in 1976, but made no comment  on the improvement.  

I want definitely a DRY CABIN!!

 



WaveDancer & Bella said:

I want definitely a DRY CABIN!!

 

I am sure that we all want a dry cabin. 

However, unless we always sail on  smooth water with light winds, sailing is a wet business.

Deck hatches are the worst to make watertight. Probably the only really watertight hatches

are the ones you can buy from the chandleries, with metal frames, rubber sealed edges and positive lock downs. 

......Probably the only really watertight hatches are the ones you can buy from the chandleries, with metal frames, rubber sealed edges and positive lock downs.....

very good jocke patrick.... what is about SMART engineering...????



wakataitea said:

......Probably the only really watertight hatches are the ones you can buy from the chandleries, with metal frames, rubber sealed edges and positive lock downs.....

very good jocke patrick.... what is about SMART engineering...????

Ok then Hans tell them about your hatches, they all just brushed me off when I did and I'm quite sure its the answer.

i am getting tiered to explain everything twice. they just should look at the pictures... or stick to the plan... and keep sailing in calm conditions...

Seems "sealed and watertight hatches" are quite an issue! 1038 views!? And everybody is free to ignore it... never mind... I think the proposed solution below is still the best...

Yes.  I used that hatch cover design on my Piver Nugget in 1964.

It worked very well, but was not completely waterproof.

When completely swamped water could still be squirted in thru the drainholes. 

I don't get it. Maybe nobody followed the link. Here is the way to make hatch combings that are dry for the same reason chandlery bought ones are. Doesn't anyone have anything to say? What are some criticisms? I heard of it during construction but didn't use it and now intend to chisel apart my combings at great cost to do it right.

Glen, maybe I am a bit thick, but I don't understand your drawing.

Can you please explain how it works ?.

Sorry about my Saturday post.  I was completely off topic there. :(

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