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Disassemble and load a Tiki 26 onto a trailer on dry land?

If anyone has advice on conducting this operation without a crane, I would be much obliged to hear it.  The boat is currently resting on four stacks of 6x6" blocks in a boatyard, with the trailer close by.  There is also a set of cradles, presumably left over from the building process.  My best idea so far is to mount wheels on the cradles, place them just aft of the midpoints, lower the hulls down onto them using jacks, then disassemble the crossbeam lashings and separate them.  I then picture rolling each hull individually up to the back of the trailer, pivoting the bows up, then letting them gently down onto the trailer and levering the stern up, then using the winch and rollers on the trailer to move them forward into traveling position.  I welcome critiques!

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Good for you, Randall.
Personally, I enjoy the chin scratching projects (oh..and lunch too).
Hey David,
On one occasion, with a New England winter fast approaching and finding ourselves bereft of legal tender we dropped the mast on our Tiki 30 by pullling the boat (by hand - we had lots of friends, just no money) on its dollies over to a telephone pole near the public launch, climbing the telephone pole and hanging a pulley off one of the spikes in the pole, attaching a line to the top of the mast and 'gently' lowering it. It worked, it was fun, we had much of the 'material inspiration' you note in your post, but not recommended as a regular practice. One thing this taught us, however, is that we do NOT want to handle wooden masts again. That Tiki 30 mast took 3 big guys to move. For our Tiki 46, the masts will be aluminum and we'll keep 'crane money' in reserve.

boatsmith said:
I have seen pictures of the trailer and cradles for this boat . In my part of the world a crane to do this work would come in at their minimum, $300. To build a gantry and come up with appropriate rigging and go through the process it would be very easy to approach this price. Sure if you have the lumber and bolts, and some chain falls, and straps you can save a few bucks if you don't value your time and have the required skills. I have cut down trees and built gin poles and used water pipe A frames and once a high wire between two windows and block with the line hooked to my truck for leverage. I several times pulled my boat up alongside a bridge and lifted my 45' mast off with the help of several friends. The crane in those days at the yard would have been $80. It cost me easily 2/3 of that in liquor and herb. But I was younger and dumber and fortunately also lucky. I didn't drop anything, nothing got broken and nobody got hurt. Pulling these hulls up onto Betsy's trailer will be difficult. On the other hand if you have some beer and good reefer and lots of time and no money then it becomes an adventure. Just my thoughts
Congrats Randy. BUT we all want to see some photos. and folks that read this in the future will want to see some as well. IF there is a common denominator amongst the cult members ,it is that we all hate to part with our cash.
Bob, we have the wooden mast on our T30 as well. It cost me more(I pay for labor), weighs more, and has rot potential, I won't use a wooden mast on any more of my boats. For a customer, if that's what they want, sure, at extra cost. We have raised and lowered our T30 mast with a strut off the front and it is fairly easy. My local yard still only charges me $100 to up or down my mast so we usually use the crane. If you are hiring equipment to load boat parts it will save you lots of money if you are already rigged when the equipment shows up. Some yards are also more brutal than others. I have paid $2,000 to offload my boat parts and set the cockpit and mast and then reverse after a show. I have also paid $600 for the same work at a different yard. It pays to shop. Cheers, David
David,

You caught me red-handed. While I fully intended to photo document the process, my mind was so preoccupied with the mechanical aspect of the job, that when I arrived in Staten Island, I realized that there was one tool missing from the bag: my camera. I promise to do a better job next time.

To the mast comments: Taking down Espresso's aluminum mast was a breeze...I was very thankful for it. Receipts from the original builder indicate it cost $403 with clear anodized finish in 2005.

Randy



boatsmith said:
Congrats Randy. BUT we all want to see some photos. and folks that read this in the future will want to see some as well. IF there is a common denominator amongst the cult members ,it is that we all hate to part with our cash.
Bob, we have the wooden mast on our T30 as well. It cost me more(I pay for labor), weighs more, and has rot potential, I won't use a wooden mast on any more of my boats. For a customer, if that's what they want, sure, at extra cost. We have raised and lowered our T30 mast with a strut off the front and it is fairly easy. My local yard still only charges me $100 to up or down my mast so we usually use the crane. If you are hiring equipment to load boat parts it will save you lots of money if you are already rigged when the equipment shows up. Some yards are also more brutal than others. I have paid $2,000 to offload my boat parts and set the cockpit and mast and then reverse after a show. I have also paid $600 for the same work at a different yard. It pays to shop. Cheers, David
I know what you mean. I frequently get so involved that I forget to take any pictures of some very cool stuff.
David

hello Randall,

i made a copy from a expending stiletto catamaran trailor,they have galvaniced pipes who go in each other,assambling is much more easy,and better for your boat,rase mast with a trailor winch.

 

greetings,

Marco

Thanks Marco!  Do you have more photos of the trailer?  I would love to see close up photos of where the pipes attach and how the cradles are constructed.

marco said:

hello Randall,

i made a copy from a expending stiletto catamaran trailor,they have galvaniced pipes who go in each other,assambling is much more easy,and better for your boat,rase mast with a trailor winch.

 

greetings,

Marco

hi Randall,

i could not find square galvaniced pipe ,so i build mine in round,65 and 80mm with a wall of 4mm,the square pipe is the trailor of a stiletto 27.

this is strong enough for a  21 from 400 kg,but a 26 is about 700 kg,this gives some ??? 

Attachments:

some more pictures of the stiletto 27 trailer.

i welded a part on my mast to put a rope true,to give tension to prevent mast from falling sideways i bind these on my middle beam cleats,after rising this rope is very helpful to create a nice shadowplace to bind on,in some days i lower my mast then i can make a picture from the situation

 

greetings,

Marco

Attachments:
Great detail photos, Marco.  Thanks very much.  I was looking at my trailer today and thinking about how I could do something similar, but my wheels are outside the hulls, which would be a barrier to expanding them sideways.  I could put them on a shorter axle so that they are between the hulls, like yours, but I wonder about roll/lateral stability on the road.  I also store my cross-beams and mast between the hulls, so would lose much of that space.  I realize your boat is smaller, but do you ever feel like your boat could roll when you make a turn?  And where do you store your beams and mast during transport?

marco said:

some more pictures of the stiletto 27 trailer.

i welded a part on my mast to put a rope true,to give tension to prevent mast from falling sideways i bind these on my middle beam cleats,after rising this rope is very helpful to create a nice shadowplace to bind on,in some days i lower my mast then i can make a picture from the situation

 

greetings,

Marco

hello Randall,

in the origial design from the stiletto 27 the hulls go over your weels,the picture is a bit gaotic but the white "v" shows the place where the hull belongs to be for transport,mine hulls stay outside !!!

this gives a traier from 2,90 cm wide,but i live in Turkey,there they don"t look so close,i drive slowly over a bad road for short disances,but i think i don"t like to go 100 km/h or more.

i don"t have a trampoline,but ply there also ,i can store all deckparts beams and mast in between the hulls,exept where the engine is on is laying on a cabine roof binded.

fair winds,

Marco

 

 

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Ah, yes, I see.  Thanks!

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