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I had to spend some extra time on this stern section due to dropping the stern during the turn over process and the hull landing on the post and cracking. The butt straps in the pictures were lengthened and extend down into the stern area. They were tapered to fit into the tight area, and notched to cover the surface of the exposed area. We screwed and glued them in place, then added the fillets over the entire structure. It is now very stiff.

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Comment by Jacques on January 8, 2009 at 2:44pm
Well, I had problems with these posts too. Did not read properly the plans and ended with 15 cm too long posts. After a moment of panicking (did I get the whole thing wrong?), cut, shortened, re strapped them. No worry though, the whole area is completely enclosed, burried, glued and glassed with the upper hulls sheeting, this is strong like hell.
Comment by Budget Boater on January 8, 2009 at 2:58pm
Actually, it is too long for building purposed when it is upside down. After you turn it over, you are supposed to cut off part of it and add the upper section and butt straps. You didn't do anything wrong (except when you added the upper part before cutting off the lower part.) As you said, it all worked out...it's all good!

Can you post a picture of your completed (or near completed) Galley and head area to you profile. I would like to see what it looks like.

Regards
Comment by Jacques on January 11, 2009 at 2:31pm
Here are the pictures on my profile. Nothing much to say about the galley which is standard. For the heads, I added a bulkhead, so I have now a sail locker just behind the first beam. Enough space is left for the toilet area.
I posted also picture of my front set up with the spin pole and forestay bridles.

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