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Hello, i am about to buy a Tiki 30 and i have been looking at all the different options for a pod.

I appears that most of the pods are less wide than the space between hulls...

and i am wondering why ?

On a boat like Tiki 30 wise use of space is crucial right ?

So here is an example of a Tiki30 with the most commonly seen pod, and the 2nd photo of a tiki30 operating in thailand.

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Screen%20Shot%202017-04-03%20at%204.28.09%20PM.png

I would definitely go for the 2nd photo... but i want to know WHY so few people take this option???

Too heavy?

too difficult or not safe enough to go to the mast/bow from the cockpit?

too much exposure to the wind?

Thanks for your comments!

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the TOP-POP-POD is a idea i have dream for long...

and if it doesn't work for some reason, i have this option:

i plan to sail to the south pacific and remain there, so protection from sun, rain and wind is compulsory

Actually one reason it may not work is the weight (like Brett was mentioning)

This Top Pop Pod will rest on the beams like that:

Joke: in case of emergency, this pod could work as a life raft... Maybe with a small sail? or use the solar panels on the pod's roof to power an electric engine?

just joking...

bruno legenne said:

Actually one reason it may not work is the weight (like Brett was mentioning)

This Top Pop Pod will rest on the beams like that:

Rotating hatches from B Hasler fitted into the tops of main hatch could be a good alternative to pods. Cheers
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The Thailand T 30 with deck pod is our's .

When deciding upon the design we wanted a deck cabin which was spacious inside, would incorporate a double berth plus lots of under seat stowage ,plus the (rather enormous) fridge.We wanted to keep the cabin as low as possible but did require comfortable sitting head room for 2-3 adults. A deck cabin never makes a (wharram) boat prettier but we did want it esthetically pleasing ,if only from some angles.We work in the tropics and only do coastal sailing.So the purpose of the cabin is primarily shelter for sun and rain, not the cold and not from heavy seas. Our deck cabin is the full width of the cockpit , the sides are built up on the outer edges of the (then ) existing open cockpit. There is little point in having the sides sloping inwards. Whilst this looks nice from the outside it means reducing space inside and you can not sit comfortably,leaning back wards . The back is completely open, the cockpit seats simply continue into the deck cabin. This means you can enter the cabin without having to stand up in order to enter it , you simply slide sideways to enter it . This in turn means you can have a lower bimini as well. The sides are ( very ) slightly sloping inwards , mainly for esthetic reasons . The aft side of the cabin is higher then the forward side , full sitting head room in the forward part  of the cockpit tray is not neccessary , a sloping roof rids (rain) water more easily and greatly improves looks too.

The front side is sloping and has two rather large windows . We found a long time ago that if you have large front windows , then shaping themlike "cats' eyes " improves looks . The windows are large enough to offer sufficient view when steering from the cockpit in the shade under the bimini such as one does when motoring in calms. Obviously there are blind spots ,so for safety reasons one doe have to pp out from the merciful shade of the bimini every now and then to take a good look around for any potential dangers yet faraway but approaching. When sailing one sits on the hull cabin roof . You have to as from under the bimini you cannot see the sails . From this sailing steering position one 's eyes are amply higher then the top of the deck cabin so the latter does not impede all -round vision at all . The front windows have canvas/clear plastic roll up hatches.

In pleasant weather these stay open providing a cooling breeze, when sailing to windward in choppy seas or when it rains they are rolled down , thus keeping the interior of the deck cabin pleasant and dry.

As the deck cabin is little more then a 6mm ply/glass rigid tent over the cockpit it is not heavy. If the whole thing weighs more then 30 kg I'd be very surprised.

For our purposes ( coastal sailing in mostly benign tropical weather)  or deck pod/bimini  combination works very well and I would not know how to improve upon it .

                                   Maxim Jurgens 

                                          Siam Sailing, Phuket , Thailand 

 

      

Very interesting Maxim. I've been looking at your cabin for quite a while now. Do you have any plans/sketches you might consider sharing?

Cheers

Thank you very much Maxim for such detailed comment... very helpful. Yes your pod is the best one (to my opinion) i have seen so far. My plan is to make one similar, but with the possibility of heading to the open ocean, so mine may be lower with a pop up system.



Maxim Jurgens said:

The Thailand T 30 with deck pod is our's .

When deciding upon the design we wanted a deck cabin which was spacious inside, would incorporate a double berth plus lots of under seat stowage ,plus the (rather enormous) fridge.We wanted to keep the cabin as low as possible but did require comfortable sitting head room for 2-3 adults. A deck cabin never makes a (wharram) boat prettier but we did want it esthetically pleasing ,if only from some angles.We work in the tropics and only do coastal sailing.So the purpose of the cabin is primarily shelter for sun and rain, not the cold and not from heavy seas. Our deck cabin is the full width of the cockpit , the sides are built up on the outer edges of the (then ) existing open cockpit. There is little point in having the sides sloping inwards. Whilst this looks nice from the outside it means reducing space inside and you can not sit comfortably,leaning back wards . The back is completely open, the cockpit seats simply continue into the deck cabin. This means you can enter the cabin without having to stand up in order to enter it , you simply slide sideways to enter it . This in turn means you can have a lower bimini as well. The sides are ( very ) slightly sloping inwards , mainly for esthetic reasons . The aft side of the cabin is higher then the forward side , full sitting head room in the forward part  of the cockpit tray is not neccessary , a sloping roof rids (rain) water more easily and greatly improves looks too.

The front side is sloping and has two rather large windows . We found a long time ago that if you have large front windows , then shaping themlike "cats' eyes " improves looks . The windows are large enough to offer sufficient view when steering from the cockpit in the shade under the bimini such as one does when motoring in calms. Obviously there are blind spots ,so for safety reasons one doe have to pp out from the merciful shade of the bimini every now and then to take a good look around for any potential dangers yet faraway but approaching. When sailing one sits on the hull cabin roof . You have to as from under the bimini you cannot see the sails . From this sailing steering position one 's eyes are amply higher then the top of the deck cabin so the latter does not impede all -round vision at all . The front windows have canvas/clear plastic roll up hatches.

In pleasant weather these stay open providing a cooling breeze, when sailing to windward in choppy seas or when it rains they are rolled down , thus keeping the interior of the deck cabin pleasant and dry.

As the deck cabin is little more then a 6mm ply/glass rigid tent over the cockpit it is not heavy. If the whole thing weighs more then 30 kg I'd be very surprised.

For our purposes ( coastal sailing in mostly benign tropical weather)  or deck pod/bimini  combination works very well and I would not know how to improve upon it .

                                   Maxim Jurgens 

                                          Siam Sailing, Phuket , Thailand 

 

      

You managed to find a tiki 30 for sale? Luck you.

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