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g,day all.well all this wind and cyclonic weather to the north of me has got me thinking about sails for my girl.as i intend on doing some long offshore passages i was wondering what i would need in the way of reefs etc.what is a ballpark figure for the sails and who would you recomend to make them.

cheers paul.

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Laurent,

Very odd about the Tasker representative! Here is the description of the sails I received from Mike Tasker himself in the price quote:
--------------------------
Tiki 26 Sails

Wingsail Gaff Mainsail Offshore:

6.3 oz US Dacron Crosscut
Luff 6.40: Leech 7: Head 1.55: Foot 3.55:
Area 16.90:
2 reefs
Luff and head sleeves
2 leech battens

Jib:

Jib Hanks On Offshore
6.3 oz US Dacrona Crosscut
Luff 7.20: Leech 6.5: Foot 3.15:
LP 2.90: Area 10.40m2
2 reefs
---------------------------
Perhaps using Mike Tasker's own description will help!

Precourt Systems have closed their retail shop, unfortunately. I see that APS is still selling them: http://www.apsltd.com/c-8155-precourt-system.aspx

Colligo Marine is another source for such hardware: http://www.colligomarine.com/ . Great source of information on splicing 12-strand, ie, dyneema, Dynex Dux.

3/8" = 9mm ;~)

Hampidjan Group, Reykjavik, Iceland, is the producer of Dynex Dux. You should be able to find a distributor in France.
Photos, Kim, photos!

kim whitmyre said:
I went out with my wife and friends yesterday, out of Los Angeles Harbor, Angels' Gate. The breeze was in the 12 - 14 knot range most of the time, it was sunny: xlnt! Coming out of Angels' Gate, Catalina Island's south end is practically due south, and the breeze is normally southwesterly by late morning, and continues to veer clockwise as the day progresses to a westerly.

I was using my new jib sheeting plan: for all but windward work, the jib sheet runs to a turning block shackled to a modified chainplate mounted to the outboard end of the aft beam, through a cheekblock mounted on the inner edge of the aft cabin wall, to a flying double block (one sheave for each sheet) centered right in front of the aft beam. These sheets are thus cross-sheeted to the winches.

So, going out on a close reach, the above plan works very well. Vaea was doing 7-9 knots, depending on how well the skipper paid attention to keeping the telltales streaming aft! After about 1 1/2 hours, I reversed course and headed for Angels' Gate. With 3 miles to go to the Gate, on a port tack, I soft-shackled the windward sheets to the clew of the jib, leaving the reaching sheets on the clew. Then I run the windward sheet to a stand-up block mounted on a car and track just on the aft seat edge, directly to the winch. This winch is free due to the cross-sheeting of the reaching sheets. I take up the windward sheet, release the reaching sheet, and am ready for what is locally called "Hurricane Gulch." The afternoon breeze gets accelerated due to the Palos Verdes headland and roars down practically parallel to the breakwater: windsurfer heaven! Due to the veering of the breeze, the approach becomes a beat to windward, and despite have to do an abrupt turn to starboard to avoid some supertanker steaming westward, Vaea was still doing 8-9 knots and occasionally better: folks who had been sitting forward of the mast beam retreated to the cabin or cockpit as it was getting wet out front! I've learned that its best to enter Angels' Gate on a diagonal course because with the Hurricane bearing down on you, turning kills boat speed and you get blown towards the rocks of a huge mole before you begin to creep along with the wind dead on your nose: not good!

Once inside the Gate, it's close-hauled on a port tack until you get on a line to the main channel, and then you gradually fall off the wind, until its coming over the aft port quarter. Still had a nice boat speed of 7 knots and up, which is very comforting faced with all the large rocks of the moles!

Long story short, the new sails and new jib sheeting arrangement are most enjoyable!

I did have a problem raising the main due to my pennant reefing lines having tied themselves into knots. . .I think they need loops sewn into the leech to run through so they do not get tangled up.
i love you

kim whitmyre said:
Laurent,

Very odd about the Tasker representative! Here is the description of the sails I received from Mike Tasker himself in the price quote:
--------------------------
Tiki 26 Sails

Wingsail Gaff Mainsail Offshore:

6.3 oz US Dacron Crosscut
Luff 6.40: Leech 7: Head 1.55: Foot 3.55:
Area 16.90:
2 reefs
Luff and head sleeves
2 leech battens

Jib:

Jib Hanks On Offshore
6.3 oz US Dacrona Crosscut
Luff 7.20: Leech 6.5: Foot 3.15:
LP 2.90: Area 10.40m2
2 reefs
---------------------------
Perhaps using Mike Tasker's own description will help!

Precourt Systems have closed their retail shop, unfortunately. I see that APS is still selling them: http://www.apsltd.com/c-8155-precourt-system.aspx

Colligo Marine is another source for such hardware: http://www.colligomarine.com/ . Great source of information on splicing 12-strand, ie, dyneema, Dynex Dux.

3/8" = 9mm ;~)

Hampidjan Group, Reykjavik, Iceland, is the producer of Dynex Dux. You should be able to find a distributor in France.
Randall,

I actually forgot to take my camera! I will soon rectify that, as just last evening I ordered a GoPro HD camera and mount for Vaea. . .Film at 11! ;~)

Kim

Bonjour tout le monde,

 

What about a furler for the jib.

For exemple Profurl C260 or  Plastimo 609T.

Regards

Georges

 

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