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Hi folks,

My Tiki Itatae building process is nearing (hopefully happy) ending and now the question is what kind of glue/adhesive would be smart to use for gluing rubber on the beam blocks?

I found 4mm rubber that I think would to the trick, but I have no glue which kind of glue to use for it. I searched the forum and found one solution to use Sika-two-hundred-or-something but with pre-heating the rubber with blow-torch... it seems kind of complicated... Maybe just scratch it with sandpaper and splash some marine sika - would it work?

Any ideas?

Thanks for advance

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Contact cement

Hi, could you please specify, what kind of brand you suggest for contact cement?

thanx

Chuck Valley said:

Contact cement

Just basic contact cement. There are many brands available, but generally speaking, contact cement is made for rubber and plastic and does the job well. Stick with a name brand - DAP, Scotch, 3M, Weldwood, LePage, etc.



agur paesüld said:

Hi, could you please specify, what kind of brand you suggest for contact cement?

thanx

Chuck Valley said:

Contact cement

Thanks!



Budget Boater said:

Just basic contact cement. There are many brands available, but generally speaking, contact cement is made for rubber and plastic and does the job well. Stick with a name brand - DAP, Scotch, 3M, Weldwood, LePage, etc.



agur paesüld said:

Hi, could you please specify, what kind of brand you suggest for contact cement?

thanx

Chuck Valley said:

Contact cement

Use epoxy: clean the rubber with acetone, then use 80 grit  sandpaper the surface to be glued  and then glue it with epoxy (maybe  thickened with cotton powder). 

The building instructions describe it similarly.

I use basic super glue with no issues. I just do four dabs or so on top and side and use mountain bike inner tube for rubber. 

I used epoxy for the sake of having nothing else available at the time. No issues so far.

I think you can possibly over think this. Once the glue is set and the beam is in position and lashed down, it will also help hold the rubber in position. If the beam is moving to the point where the rubber is compromised I think you have bigger issues to worry about.   

I also used epoxy. Cleaned the rubber with solvent, used 40 grit on the sanding disc to really key the surface, then wrapped the rubber round a curved surface to open the cuts , then scrubbed the epoxy glue in with a brush for good full contact then stuck on. No problems. With 4mm you could also estimate your compression and screw(counter sinking your screws below the surface once compressed) as well if you really want to.  This rubber needs to stay in place. have fun

Thanks for the replies! I found some kind of contact cement (I gave a thought to epoxy as well, but considered it would be too much nuisance if rubber needs to be replaced in some point) from Würth, we'll see how it goes.

Have to move my ass though, if I want to get onto water this year... as the season here in NE corner of Europe will soon end... all those little odd jobs take sooo much time...

Be careful. You have one chance to align the two pieces and you cannot reposition it.

I plan to use self sticking rubber roofing material comes in a big roll --

While non-maritime products may work, my preference is 3M 4200. It's not as "permanent" as 3M 5200, but will be more than adequate for the job.

Omar

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