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I hope to do quite a bit of winter sailing / camping and need to heat the cabin from time to time. using my cook stove or any other open flame seems unsafe. Any ideas?

Thanks
Brandon

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I've sailed Ushuaia to Antartica on a tall ship and would definitely not recommend doing it on a Wharram... :-(

There's crazy and there's crazy (no offense meant if somebody's done it though).  Call me a wus if you like, but even with six layers of clothing I was getting cold after half an hour on watch.  Yachts do go down there but they tend to be fairly big and heavy displacement, well insulated with good heating inside.  You need something designed for spending lots of time down below.  Wharrams are the opposite, ideal for the outdoor lifestyle, enjoying the sun, partying, drinking rum punch, generally relaxing and having a good time.  England is as cold a place as I want to be on my Wharram!  ;-)

It was said before between the lines but not explicitedly.

If you want to heat your cabin, you should consider that an open flame which burns either oil or gas produces a lot of humidity. This is because oils and gas are so-called hydrocarbons and by burning those you will get mainly carbon dioxide and WATER. This will definitely condense at non isolated walls, if they are of plywood or else.

The only solution for an efficient and safe heating in my opinion is to use stove with exhaust systems. So the heat will stay in the cabin whilst the moisture goes outside through he chimney. The small iron oven suggested by Ralf should do a good job on a Tiki 21.

Regards, Armin

I use a catalytic gas heater in my van. It is worth commenting on the actual amount of humidity created.

The heater is rated at 800w but I find I only need to run it at low - about 200w. to heat a space comparable to the cabin on my P 31. The full power is good for initial warm - up.

I also. like most people, cook on gas so a comparison is valid. A gas ring produces 1500 / 2200w. Humidity produced is directly related to wattage [and gas used ]. So my heater produces less than 50% humidity on full and maybe 10% on normal compared to a gas ring. In fact most of the condensation in cooking comes from the kettle / boiling pot etc. not the ring.

So if you want to test your boat light one cooker ring on low with no pot on top. If you have a problem with this then you will have a problem with a heater.

Basically if you can cook on gas you can certainly heat with it.

I love my heater . It not only keeps the van warm for camping but gives a positive radiant heat that ensures me a constant supply of dry warm socks, boots, hats, etc.

I considered a wood stove for my boat, but even at 31 ft I would not be happy with one. These boats are very small inside - especially very narrow. I could not see me safely scrunching past a scalding hot stove in a narrow passage without headroom to get into my bunk for instance.

There is also the issue of dedicating so much permanent space to something which may only be used a few hours a year.

If I get a heater it will be a gas catalyst one possibly the 400w portable type as sold by Colemans which uses 1lb bottles. Affordable. Simple. More time for sailing.

These heaters have a very good reputation among campers / hunters / R.V. etc. Many of my friends also use them so I speak first - hand.

I just joined this site, so perhaps I can add my thoughts with this Amazon URL:  http://www.amazon.com/Mr-Heater-F215100-3800-BTU-Indoor-Safe/dp/B00...

Caravan, catalytic, and all propane heaters which don't have exhaust flues are just plain dangerous in the hulls. 

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