Wharram Builders and Friends

A Photo & Discussion Forum for Wharram Design Enthusiasts

A place to list the good and the bad modifications that your Wharram has or that you may be thinking of making. Everyone would love to know what works and what does not - structurally, aesthetically, and usefulness.

Photos, your honest opinions, and your experiences are welcome here.

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HI Bertran,
Those sails look wonderful to us! That was really your immagination taking flight! The curve looks beautiful and I am sure the wind will love it. We are so eager to welcome you and PHA II to America and we will be curious to see your build. Much love, Ann and NEv

Bertrand FERCOT said:
Tiki30 modified rig

After to have studied how works really the sails last Winter , instead to continue to copy the wing airplanes as last year, I tried to apply the conclusion of my search : the lenticular profile ( part of a cylinder or of a conic shape) is able to generate a good drive force when closing the wind with no angle of attack (so the sail drag is very low).
For that I re use my first wishbones I made in Martinique, but I replace the straight swinging battens by light wishbones in order to get a deep and continue cylindric shape on the leeward :



How it looks when sailing :


We had only one test with a good wind of 20kts and more in the gusts and we were very surprised to feel the accelerations. The boat was faster and the next big test will be when we'll sail from Brest to Hamble river to join the UK Junk rig rally in 3 weeks.

Bertrand
I have just bought the Tiki 26 plan 381, so i am very interested by your modifications. I also would like to live aboard. Is it possible to have some photos of your Tiki now, on the site or by mail.
Bon vents.
Georges.

Tarcisio Silva said:
I finished my Tiki 21' on November 20, 2001. And since this day I living aboard and had sailing +/- 2000 NM of Brazilian coast.
I build strictely the building plans, as James advert on the first page of plans. However, along the last 5 years, I made many modifications and adaptations on our boat, for use as a sailhome cruiser. I think the more important is:

1. A little extra height top cabin (160mm) in the same way as in TIKI 38’.
2. Slatted deck (600 x 2000 mm) plus netting at stern.
3. Slatted deck at bow (open/closed ratio 1:1). Very nice!
4. Extra height PVC tent. Headroom max. 1,54m.,on the platform.
5. Extra forestay bridle, forestay and shrouds, 4mm spectra rope. In very light winds we use another jib at bow spirit. And when the wind come from back we use twin jib.
6. Aluminium mast mounted on original wood mast foot.
7. Cut off 500mm of tillers, giving circulation space back the motor on sllated aft deck.
8. Hidraulic Lavac toillet on portboard hull.
9. Splash deflector at centre crossbeam. Similar to the Tiki 8m.
10. Lifelines attached on aluminium posts at center and bow crossbeams, and a stern support. Just to give privacy when we stay at mooring.
11. Wet locker at central platform.
12. Motor 8.0 hp, Mariner 2 stroke.
13. Mast foot blocks. To prevent the mast not slide to the sides, if broken the original slide sistem.
14. Wishbone boom .
we had a 46 ft oro, the builder stayed to the plans but when finished his wife was unhappy with the accomadation and the open bridgedeck. he simply changed the flexible beam system to solid by wrapping steel straps around the beams and down onto the hulls and thru bolting the straps to the hulls. he then built a bridgedeck saloon that gave access to both hulls. the boat is still sailing 30 years later, is very comfortable and sails well with no noticeable flexing. we found it a big plus in nz weather which can be wet and cold at times.
Hi Dave,
I wish that either you or a friend would get hold of a digital camera and take some detail and over all photographs of your comfortable 30 year old Oro with retro fitted non flexible beam fastenings and over lapping deck house. Sounds like lots of folks would be interested in that because of living maybe in colder or wetter climates and maybe wanting to get out of the weather. What would work on an Oro could be made to work on most Wharram designs.
We are fortunate to be able to move the boat to escape wet and cold weather (that's why we left Britain!) so we like the design as planned with the outdoor features. But options that have been successful for 30 years are always interesting.
Thanks for writing in - Ann and Nev

dave tomlinson said:
we had a 46 ft oro, the builder stayed to the plans but when finished his wife was unhappy with the accomadation and the open bridgedeck. he simply changed the flexible beam system to solid by wrapping steel straps around the beams and down onto the hulls and thru bolting the straps to the hulls. he then built a bridgedeck saloon that gave access to both hulls. the boat is still sailing 30 years later, is very comfortable and sails well with no noticeable flexing. we found it a big plus in nz weather which can be wet and cold at times.
yes i think it could work on others and i tested in in some big seas, it used galvanised steel straps but stainless would be better as down near the waterline was rusting a bit. i think i have put up some photos on here somewhere but will try again,

Ann and Neville Clement said:
Hi Dave,
I wish that either you or a friend would get hold of a digital camera and take some detail and over all photographs of your comfortable 30 year old Oro with retro fitted non flexible beam fastenings and over lapping deck house. Sounds like lots of folks would be interested in that because of living maybe in colder or wetter climates and maybe wanting to get out of the weather. What would work on an Oro could be made to work on most Wharram designs.
We are fortunate to be able to move the boat to escape wet and cold weather (that's why we left Britain!) so we like the design as planned with the outdoor features. But options that have been successful for 30 years are always interesting.
Thanks for writing in - Ann and Nev

dave tomlinson said:
we had a 46 ft oro, the builder stayed to the plans but when finished his wife was unhappy with the accomadation and the open bridgedeck. he simply changed the flexible beam system to solid by wrapping steel straps around the beams and down onto the hulls and thru bolting the straps to the hulls. he then built a bridgedeck saloon that gave access to both hulls. the boat is still sailing 30 years later, is very comfortable and sails well with no noticeable flexing. we found it a big plus in nz weather which can be wet and cold at times.
some photos, bridgedeck cabin has since been rebuilt with more headroom by new owners

Ann and Neville Clement said:
Hi Dave,
I wish that either you or a friend would get hold of a digital camera and take some detail and over all photographs of your comfortable 30 year old Oro with retro fitted non flexible beam fastenings and over lapping deck house. Sounds like lots of folks would be interested in that because of living maybe in colder or wetter climates and maybe wanting to get out of the weather. What would work on an Oro could be made to work on most Wharram designs.
We are fortunate to be able to move the boat to escape wet and cold weather (that's why we left Britain!) so we like the design as planned with the outdoor features. But options that have been successful for 30 years are always interesting.
Thanks for writing in - Ann and Nev

dave tomlinson said:
we had a 46 ft oro, the builder stayed to the plans but when finished his wife was unhappy with the accomadation and the open bridgedeck. he simply changed the flexible beam system to solid by wrapping steel straps around the beams and down onto the hulls and thru bolting the straps to the hulls. he then built a bridgedeck saloon that gave access to both hulls. the boat is still sailing 30 years later, is very comfortable and sails well with no noticeable flexing. we found it a big plus in nz weather which can be wet and cold at times.
Attachments:
2 more of the oro

dave tomlinson said:
some photos, bridgedeck cabin has since been rebuilt with more headroom by new owners

Ann and Neville Clement said:
Hi Dave,
I wish that either you or a friend would get hold of a digital camera and take some detail and over all photographs of your comfortable 30 year old Oro with retro fitted non flexible beam fastenings and over lapping deck house. Sounds like lots of folks would be interested in that because of living maybe in colder or wetter climates and maybe wanting to get out of the weather. What would work on an Oro could be made to work on most Wharram designs.
We are fortunate to be able to move the boat to escape wet and cold weather (that's why we left Britain!) so we like the design as planned with the outdoor features. But options that have been successful for 30 years are always interesting.
Thanks for writing in - Ann and Nev

dave tomlinson said:
we had a 46 ft oro, the builder stayed to the plans but when finished his wife was unhappy with the accomadation and the open bridgedeck. he simply changed the flexible beam system to solid by wrapping steel straps around the beams and down onto the hulls and thru bolting the straps to the hulls. he then built a bridgedeck saloon that gave access to both hulls. the boat is still sailing 30 years later, is very comfortable and sails well with no noticeable flexing. we found it a big plus in nz weather which can be wet and cold at times.
Attachments:
2 more of the oro

dave tomlinson said:
some photos, bridgedeck cabin has since been rebuilt with more headroom by new owners

Ann and Neville Clement said:
Hi Dave,
I wish that either you or a friend would get hold of a digital camera and take some detail and over all photographs of your comfortable 30 year old Oro with retro fitted non flexible beam fastenings and over lapping deck house. Sounds like lots of folks would be interested in that because of living maybe in colder or wetter climates and maybe wanting to get out of the weather. What would work on an Oro could be made to work on most Wharram designs.
We are fortunate to be able to move the boat to escape wet and cold weather (that's why we left Britain!) so we like the design as planned with the outdoor features. But options that have been successful for 30 years are always interesting.
Thanks for writing in - Ann and Nev

dave tomlinson said:
we had a 46 ft oro, the builder stayed to the plans but when finished his wife was unhappy with the accomadation and the open bridgedeck. he simply changed the flexible beam system to solid by wrapping steel straps around the beams and down onto the hulls and thru bolting the straps to the hulls. he then built a bridgedeck saloon that gave access to both hulls. the boat is still sailing 30 years later, is very comfortable and sails well with no noticeable flexing. we found it a big plus in nz weather which can be wet and cold at times.
Attachments:
My Tiki 30 got built with plywood, stretched by 75 cm and we also eliminated the chines. The result is great - much less pitching, almost 900 ltr more boyancy or payload and a huge cockpit. She's fast, pointing also a bit higher to windward comparded to other T30's. Wave
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